19. Pin Ups

pin ups

Pin Ups” is David Bowie’s 7th studio album and was originally released on 19th October 1973.

On 3rd July 1973, David Bowie famously killed off Ziggy Stardust and declared he would never tour again. The following night he enjoyed a retirement party at Cafe Royal in London with a bunch of celebrities buddies and a few severely pissed off Spiders From Mars. And so that was that.

So with future tours put on hold and with it having been ages since he last released a new album (“Aladdin Sane” less than 3 months ago), what else was there for Bowie to do but record a new album and keep his successful momentum flowing.

The plan was to record an album of covers, featuring songs from bands that Bowie loved and would watch live during the late swinging 60’s in London. With an eye on the USA market, they would be songs which were less well known in the USA than they were in the UK.

Bowie’s own notes on the album show his intentions:

These songs are among my favourites from the ’64–67′ period of London. Most of the groups were playing the Ricky-Tick (was it a ‘y’ or an ‘i’?) Scene club circuit (Marquee, eel pie island la-la). Some are still with us. Pretty Things, Them, Yardbirds, Syd’s Pink Floyd, Mojos, Who, Easybeats, Merseys, The Kinks. Love-on ya!”

Bowie also planned to dump the “Spiders From Mars” rhythm section, replacing Mick Woodmansey on drums with Aynsley Dunbar and Trevor Bolder on bass with Jack Bruce. However while Dunbar jumped at the chance, Bruce turned the invite down and so Bolder was somewhat embarrassingly asked to participate in the recording sessions. So without “Woody” on board, this album kinda marks the start of the end of Bowie’s ever so successful and brilliant “glam-rock” era.

With the rest of the usual gang still on board (the dynamic Mick Ronson on guitar, Mike Garson on piano, Ken Fordham on baritone sax and Ken Scott as co-producer), they headed on down to the famous Chateau Herouville studios near Paris to record what would be yet another No. 1 hit in the UK and what really is a fabulous album. Interestingly, Bowie would in only 3 years or so record the “Low” album at the same studio, the difference in musical vibe could not have been any starker !!

Yes there are of course a few tracks better than others on “Pin Ups”, but Bowie really does appear to be enjoying himself here and the band are in fantastic form. Mick Ronson described this as his favourite recording experience with Bowie and it really does show. I’ve always imagined this album as Ziggy Stardust having a bit of fun doing a session at the Marquee Club before the Earth finally reaches the end of its Five Years.

It all starts off with “Rosalyn” originally by The Pretty Things and it’s a real rocker, with both Ronson and Dunbar in particularly fine form. Bowie sings many of the songs on the album with quirky vocal expressions and does so here. This is basically rock ‘n’ roll at its best.

Here Come The Night” made famous by Them comes next and is another great track. The problem I’ve always had with this is that Van Morrison’s performance on the Them version is so damn good, it’s always difficult to top such an iconic version (which Bowie does very successfully elsewhere).  I don’t think this song suits the band as much as many of the others but it’s still an enjoyable listening experience.

I Wish You Would” famously covered by The Yardbirds is another fine rocker, with Ronson I’m sure keen to show off his Eric Clapton like skills.  Again, they all sound like they’re having a fun time playing tunes they love and this especially comes across with this track.

Now “See Emily Play” really is special. I love Pink Floyd and the work of poor Syd Barrett and this is one of the very best early Floyd singles. Bowie here beautifully adapts all the strangeness that Syd encapsulates and then sprinkles Bowie magic all over it all for a fantastic tribute to his musical hero. The verses here are wonderful, especially the second verse with the multi-speed vocals, but the choruses are a joy as is the extended outro section. I love the original but I love this version just as much and no greater praise can I give.

Everything’s Alright” originally by The Mojos features here some fun backing vocals but isn’t one of the stronger tracks here. Again, just close your eyes and imagine Ziggy having a fun night out and it does kinda work.

I Can’t Explain” originally by The Who is OK but not great but then I think the same can be said for The Who original as well. It’s a bit of a plodder and although Bowie sings it well and the sax throughout is wonderful, the arrangement is a bit lame as is the little guitar solo. It’s notable in being one of the very few tracks on the album that Bowie would ever perform live.

Friday On My Mind” originally by The Easybeats is almost an Australian anthem and so has a special place in my heart (I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve hummed this in the middle of a boring week). Thankfully, Bowie again does this song total justice and is an absolute highlight here. The arrangement is wonderful, Ronson plays the famous guitar riff perfectly and Bowie sings the song with all the working class, glam-rock brilliance that Harry Vanda (Easybeats member and co-writer of the song) said was the only cover version of his song that he liked.

Up next is “Sorrow” recorded famously by The Merseys and the only track released as a single, where it was yet another big hit for Bowie reaching No 3 in the UK and yes, a No 1 smash in New Zealand. Now I’ve listened to this album 100’s of times over the years and I still think this track is by far the weakest point on the album. It’s just all a bit bland and mushy, especially compared to so many of the other tracks here. But like I said, the single was a huge hit and many think it an original Bowie classic, so what would I know. There was no official video made for the single although the performance recorded for the remarkable “1980 Floor Show” has become the unofficial version. Link Sorrow Video.

sorrow

Don’t Bring Me Down” originally by The Pretty Things is another example of a great rock ‘n’ roll song being performed with aplomb. Dunbar’s drums are great, Bowie’s quirky vocals are spot on, the instrumental middle section just rocks and Bowie’s harmonica throughout just lifts the whole thing. A joy.

Shapes Of Things” is yet another highlight. Bowie has often described Ronson as his “Jeff Beck”, so it’s only natural that Bowie/Ronson would nail this version of The Yardbirds classic. Again the whole band are in fine form, but it’s Ronson’s version of the classic Jeff Beck solo that steals the show. It would have been great to have seen this performed live, if only…

Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere” is the second Who track to feature and if truth be told, is again a little disappointing. I’m not a huge Who fan so it obviously influences my judgement, but this track has always left me a little ho-hummed. It’s an OK performance but no more so than that.

Where Have All The Good Times Gone” originally by The Kinks closes the album and must have been a personal favourite of Bowie’s as it’s the only track to have its lyrics printed on the album. It’s a rather lovely version, with Mike Garson’s little piano flourishes a highlight for me as is Dunbar’s drumming. Actually, Dunbar’s drumming is a highlight throughout the album. Bowie sings this in a downbeat manner as he laments where have all the good times gone and does rather predict things to come for Bowie.

The end of the album, with the somewhat downbeat ending in terms of its vibe brings things back to the album cover, which has always been one of my favourites. A fantastic photo of a dreamy looking Twiggy (“the wonder kid”), the famous model who seems to be reminiscing of past glories maybe from the 1964-67 era the album covers, while “Ziggy” Bowie seems to be looking in dread to some horrific future to come. Where have all the good times gone indeed with his awful experiences of LA all soon to come.

So overall, a really enjoyable, fun album that did it’s job of being a perfect little filler to keep the fans amused before moving on to more series stuff.  I love it but doesn’t get ranked any higher on my list for the simple reason it doesn’t contain any Bowie originals. It’s an often forgotten album, in that its anniversary has come and gone over the years with no “special edition” as yet released although it’s been re-released and remaster a number of times. Most notable of these being the 1991 era Ryko/EMI Sound and Vision release that featured a couple of bonus tracks:

Growin’ Up“,  a cover of the Bruce Springsteen song is actually a track from very early  “Diamond Dogs” sessions and features Ron Wood on guitar. Bowie was a big fan of early Springsteen and recorded a couple of Springsteen tracks. This one sounds a little like a demo and doesn’t have the polish of a completed track. Bowie does an OK US impersonation here but perfects this vocal style by the time he gets to “Young Americans“. There was always talk of a Pin Ups II album that would feature American songs, but sadly never materialised.

Port Of Amsterdam” is actually from the Ziggy Stardust sessions and is a cover of a Jacques Brel song. It features here as it was the B-Side of the “Sorrow” single. Although I much prefer his stunning live performances of Brel’s “My Death”, this really is an excellent cover and probably deserves more credit than its received. With its slow start and building acoustic guitars, Bowie’s vocals positively soar by the end of this rather sordid little ditty. It would have been hopelessly out of place on the Ziggy Stardust album, but is the perfect B-Side gem.

There was of course no live tour for this album, Bowie had just “retired”, but Bowie did perform “Sorrow”, “Everything’s Alright” and “I Can’t Explain” as part of the fantastic “The 1980 Floor Show Midnight Special” TV special he recorded on 19th October for NBC in the US. If you haven’t seen this (possible as it’s only been officially shown in the US), it’s a superb “must-see” experience and marks the end of Ziggy Stardust with it being the last time he performed with both Mick Ronson (for many years anyways) and Trevor Bolder. The costumes themselves are worth price of admission as is Bowie’s duet with Marianne Faithfull as they perform “I’ve Got You Babe”. 1980 Floor Show link.

Other than that, the Pin Ups songs were very rarely performed live. “Sorrow” did feature a few times, especially during the 1983 “Serious Moonlight” tour, as did “I Can’t Explain” for a few of the earlier 1983 shows.

With Pin Ups,  we mark the end of an era. No more Ken Scott, Bowie’s important co-producer since “Hunky Dory”, no more Trevor Bolder, the Spider on bass also with Bowie since “Hunky Dory” and perhaps most notable of all, no more Mick Ronson, his superb side-man since “The Man Who Sold The World” and who was such an important ingredient for all the amazing, formative albums since then. It would be some 20 years before Bowie would (sadly all too briefly) reunite with Ronson.

Bowie would of course move on after the demise of Ziggy Stardust and later in the year work on yet another masterpiece. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: See Emily Play, Friday On My Mind, Shapes Of Things

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20. Young Americans

young americans

Young Americans” is David Bowie’s 9th studio album and was originally released on 7 March 1975.

Now we’re reached the Top 20, the quality of album is really starting to crank up.

By mid 1974, Bowie was creeping ever deeper into a rather dark place with massive international fame not being quite what he hoped it to be. With the gruelling “Diamond Dogs” tour and the pressures of outrageously complex theatrical nightly performances, with relationships with both his wife and his manager quickly deteriorating and on a famous diet consisting of just milk, peppers and cocaine, Bowie was both skeletal and barely coping. This was all so well documented in the brilliant “Cracked Actor” BBC documentary (watch it here).

In this environment, it’s extraordinary that Bowie decided to change his musical direction so radically from the “Glam Rock” genre that Bowie had mastered so well to the disco, black influenced “plastic soul” that was the “Young Americans” album. It was the first time while in a position of fame that Bowie decided to take such a dramatic change of musical direction and while this started his unique reputation of being the “Chameleon of Rock”, it’s easy to forgot how much professional courage such an undertaking  would have required. It could so very easily have backfired resulting in critical ridicule and the mass abandonment from his legion of fans. The fact Bowie succeeded in producing such a fine album that was a huge commercial success, especially in the tough American market where the album reached the Top 10 is a testament to the musical genius that is Bowie.

Recorded primarily during a break in the “Diamond Dogs” tour at the famous Sigma Sounds studio in Philadelphia, USA, Bowie himself described his new album somewhat derogatory as “Plastic Soul”. In truth it was anything but “plastic” or “fake” having garnered a group of highly talented (mainly) black musicians that injected a high degree of authenticity into the new album.

The only musician to survive from previous albums was pianist Mike Garson, although this would be his last album with Bowie for nearly 20 years. The album introduced a relatively unknown Puerto-Rico guitarist Carlos Alomar, who would work with Bowie for the majority Bowie’s future albums. On bass and drums were the very well respected session musicians Wellie Weeks and Tony Newmark respectively and on saxophone, the then almost unknown David Sanborn who would bring such a rich sound to the album. The impressive cast doesn’t end there. Backing vocalists included Ava Cherry, Robin Clark and a then almost unknown Luther Vandross.

Bowie would record two tracks later on in New York at the Electric Lady Studios when he got together with the one and only John Lennon, where two more highly important Bowie musicians were first introduced, Earl Slick on guitar and Dennis Davis on drums.

One other key ingredient to add into the mix was Tony Visconti, who after helping to mix the previous “Diamond Dogs” album, was reunited with Bowie for his second spell as album producer and in this case also studio engineer during the Stigma Sounds sessions.

With such an amazing cast of musicians and with the unique writing ability of David Bowie, a great album was almost guaranteed. Bowie loved “black” music that was dominating much of the US music scene at the time and wanted to create his own version of the Philly Sound, Motown, Soul Train, black styled music. He succeeded wonderfully and created one of the first white “disco” albums, before the likes of The Bee Gees, KC and the Sunshine Band,etc. made it hugely mainstream.

Don’t get me wrong, “Young Americans” is a wonderful album, but for a couple of key reasons I rate this as my least favourite album of Bowie’s unbelievable 70’s output. Music is a funny thing and much comes down to personal preferences and it’s just that disco/soul however you want to label it, is just not my favourite style of music, especially when it comes to Bowie. As much as I enjoy this album, I simply enjoy all the other Bowie albums to come in my rankings just that bit more. Additionally, there are a couple of tracks that brings down the album overall from what it could have been and that’s all it takes to be rated lower than the awesome competition.

The album kicks off with one of Bowie best known songs, the title track “Young Americans“. Describing the struggles of a young couple in post-Nixon USA, the joyous musical arrangement belies the hard hitting lyrics. Like much of the album, the track is basically recorded live in the studio and gives the song a wonderful vibe and feel that is perfectly captured by Visconti. The funky groove is fabulous as is Sanborn’s sax and with Bowie fast-flowing lyrics, this really is a classic track. The highlights for me though are the re-use of Lennon’s famous line “I heard the news today, oh boy” and the wonderful climax “Ain’t there one damn song that can make me break down and cry?“. This was released as the lead off single and became Bowie’s first top 20 US hit. No wonder really. There was no official video for this, although Bowie’s performance on the “Dick Cavett Show” is a good substitute. See it here.

young americans single cover

The next track “Win” is my favourite offering here. It’s a truly wonderful song, with Sanborn’s sax a particular highlight. It’s slower, more mellow and less wordy than much of the album and has a feel that reminds me somewhat of the “Station To Station” album to come. Bowie’s vocals move from tender to downright ominous as he sings “Someone like you should not be allowed to start any fires“.  This track along with the next (“Fascination”) were both recorded later in the year at the Record Plant studios in New York to in theory complete the album and so has a slightly different feel. I’ve always loved this track and as they say is worth price of admission alone.

Fascination” comes next with that funky groove in full swing and with Carlos Alomar’s rhythm guitar dominating throughout. Co-written with Luther Vandross and recorded in New York, the vocal arrangements with Bowie following the backup vocals during the chorus is particularly catchy.  “I know people think I’m a little crazy” does rather sum up Bowie’s experiences in the US. It’s a solid all-round track that is typical of the sound that Bowie was after with this album.

Right” is a mellow track with Bowie in fine form vocally but the unfortunate backing vocalists really struggled with the odd-ball time signatures and in-out timings (as documented on both the “Cracked Actor” and “Five Years” BBC documentaries). It’s one of my less preferred tracks although when it swings through the motions during the second half of the song, it does have a hypnotic feel. Perhaps because it was so difficult to record, this is one of those rare Bowie originals that has never been performed live.

Somebody Up There Likes Me” which opens side two in many ways is the centre-piece of the album and perfectly encapsulates the album, with it’s smooth yet funky guitar driven arrangements, catchy backing vocals, Bowie’s cool delivery and with Sanborn’s sax floating over everything. The blue-eyed soul boy at his best.

Across The Universe” is where things go very wrong. In early 1975, Bowie teamed up with John Lennon and decided to record a few tracks together at the Electric Lady studios in New York. This track is one of the results of their collaboration, a cover of Lennon’s/The Beatles classic and it just doesn’t work and it just doesn’t fit within the theme of the album. It’s bland and boring with the real tragedy being that much much better tracks were dropped to make room for this. I can only imagine Tony Visconti’s shock at hearing that this song (which would have made a perfect B-side to “Fame”) meant “Who Can I Be Now?” and “It’s Gonna Be Me” had to be dropped from the album. If not for this track, this album would likely have been rated a few notches higher, it’s that close.

Can You Hear Me” is one of the weaker tracks on the album, a ballad with a much more simplistic arrangement and featuring Bowie’s least impressive vocal performance. It’s just one of those tracks that I’ve never got into and adds weight for this to be Bowie’s least impressive 70’s era album.

Fame” is the second track to be included from the Lennon sessions and is altogether a different story. Here, Visconti can’t argue that this fully deserves it’s place on the album. Featuring a killer guitar line by Alomar (based in turn on “Foot Stompin” which Bowie had been unsuccessfully working on) and Lennon’s high pitched “Fame” backing vocal, this has become one of Bowie most loved treasures. Detailing Bowie’s disappointment having finally achieved fame, the use of multi-speed vocals is brilliant and classic Bowie. Released as the second single off the album, it achieved No 1 status in the US (Bowie’s first), one of the very few singles to chart higher in the US than in the UK where it only reached a relatively disappointing 17. Bowie no doubt thrilled to work with his hero Lennon would rank this as one of his favourite songs, with it being the song he would perform live the most throughout his career. Bowie also re-mixed “Fame” in 1990 for the movie “Pretty Woman” which had a rather excellent video. Again, there was no official video for the original “Fame”, although Bowie’s humorous, poorly lip-synced performance on Soul Train (the first white performer to feature) has become the unofficial video. Fame 90 Video.

fame

So an overall fine album, especially if you’re a fan of disco or black soul based music, but with one particular weaker moment.  And a brave album, when you consider the glam rock genre that had been Bowie’s ticket to stardom and success up to that point. But Bowie hadn’t really cracked the US as he had the UK, with glam rock just not something that appealed to enough of the market there. So a brave but also an astute move of Bowie’s by predicting the success of disco and creating an album that would ultimately appeal to a much wider audience in the market he most craved to break.

The album has been re-released a number of times, with some worth a mention.

In 1991, it was re-released and remastered on CD as part of the superb Ryko/EMI Sound and Vision series where most of the reissued albums featured bonus tracks. With the “Young Americans”, these were:

Who Can I Be Now” the first of the two tracks dropped from the original album listing to make room for the Lennon tracks. A rather nice ballad, featuring Mike Garson’s piano more predominately than elsewhere, Sanborn’s ever present sax and some wonderful backing vocal melodies, this is soooo much better than “Across The Universe”.

It’s Gonna Be Me” is another ballad with an upfront piano based arrangement, it features Bowie’s crooning, coke-cracked vocals at its best, but overall it doesn’t quite do it for me. The whole thing comes across as a little flat and is the most “plastic” of Bowie’s tracks recorded for “Young Americans”.

John, I’m Only Dancing Again” was recorded during these sessions and was originally planned to open the album before finally being dropped. A totally reworked version of Bowie’s glam classic “John, I’m Only Dancing”, only the chorus lyrics remain while the rest is transformed into a hip, disco driven funky jive 7 minute marathon. In the context of the album, it works rather well, but give me the original Ziggy versions anytime. This new version had previously seen the light of day when released as a single in 1979, the full version on 12” inch.

john-im-only-dancing-again

In 2007, a Special Release version of the album was re-issued again, this time including a DVD with a wonderful new 5.1 surround sound remix which gives the album a new lease of life.

In 2016, the album featured in the box set “Who Can I Be Now? (1974-1976)“, which also included a version of “The Gouster“, the original name for the “Young Americans” album, with the original track listing from just the first Sigma Sound sessions. It’s a nice to have although there’s nothing here that hasn’t already been previously released.

who can i be now boxset

Bowie wouldn’t officially tour the album, although when he resumed the US only “Diamond Dogs” tour, it was totally revamped with all the complex sets discarded for a more intimate live experience re-badged as “The Soul/Philly Dogs” tour which did feature some of the new material. The LA performances from this part of the tour was released for the 2017 Record Store Day on the excellent triple LP “Cracked Actor (Live Los Angeles ’74)”  which included both “It’s Gonna Be Me” and “John, I’m Only Dancing Again”. It has since been released on CD.

cracked actor lp

As I mentioned earlier, two fantastic BBC documentaries capture Bowie superbly during this important period. The first “Cracked Actor“, filmed in 1974 during the recording of the album in-between the Diamond Dogs tour is a simply stunning insight into Bowie at the time, struggling to cope with fame, LA and drugs. Cracked Actor Link. The second one is “Five Years“, in which five formative years are discussed in detail, including the 1974-75 period and the recording process for “Young Americans”. “Five Years Link“.

Many regard this as one of Bowie’s very best albums but for me, there are many more albums that I prefer. While enduring a coked-out hellish existence in LA, Bowie would refine the “soul boy” sound on his next album but add a layer of European influenced electronica to create a truly special masterpiece. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: Young Americans, Win, Fame

21. Tin Machine

tin machine album

Tin Machine” is David Bowie’s 18th studio album and was originally released on 22 May 1989.

Although officially the first of two albums by the band “Tin Machine” of which Bowie was but one humbled member, for those of you who consider the whole Tin Machine period to be just another Bowie persona, this is for all intents and purposes another Bowie studio album.

By the end of the 80’s, Bowie was in a difficult place. His last album “Never Let Me Down” was universally panned by the critics (I rated it as his worst album and artistic nadir). His “Glass Spiders” world tour of 1987, although commercially successful, was likewise viewed a critical failure, often deemed just too over-bloated and over-the-top in its production (I personally loved the shows precisely because of its theatrical values). Bowie himself felt he was struggling artistically at the time, from 1983’s “Let’s Dance” onwards if truth be told. Bowie was even considering if he actually had a future left in music and whether he should focus on acting, directing or just putting his feet up living the high life with his now considerable wealth. In the end, Bowie took a different path entirely.

After being reacquainted with the Sales brother (Tony on bass and Hunt of drums), who he had worked with in 1977 during the making of Iggy Pop’s brilliant “Lust For Life” album (next time you watch “Trainspotting”, that brilliant rhythm during the song” Lust For Life” is the Sales brothers in action), they decided to work together again on the next Bowie project. Bowie also enlisted the services of Reeves Gabrels, suitably impressed when Bowie’s then publicist suggested he should check out her husbands guitar playing. Kevin Armstrong, who had worked with Bowie on a number of occasions previously (most notably on Iggy Pop’s excellent “Blah Blah Blah” album) plays rhythm guitar throughout, but was not “officially” a member of the band.

Together, they recorded one of the most controversial albums of Bowie’s career, not only because of it’s relative “rawness” and very hard rock content but also because Bowie wanted this released not as a solo project, but as a collective band effort. Bowie also insisted it be a democratic band, in that he was simply just one member of the gang, so the band photo on the cover had Bowie as the most distant member (and what the hell, was that facial hair on Bowie !!). Bowie wasn’t mentioned anywhere on the album cover, this was a Tin Machine album.

At the time, the music itself was actually quite well received, but the notion of Bowie being just a member of the band was generally ridiculed, which I can’t help thinking consequently impacted the overall reputation of the album itself.

Overall the music is dark and can only be categorised as heavy/hard rock, the “hardest” album Bowie has recorded since 1970’s “The Man Who Sold The World”. The “Tin Machine” album though is much “trashier” in sound and much less compromising in its take no prisoners approach, with frequent swearing and direct, unambiguous lyrics. Considering his previous album was the soft rock/pop of “Never Let Me Down”, this couldn’t be more different and confrontational, especially for his then Phil Collins-type fan base he had accumulated during the 80’s. Although there is no Iggy Pop at all on the album (unlike the previous 3 albums), this sounds soooo much more like authentic Iggy Pop than anything Bowie had managed to record so far.

I remember vividly when I first bought this album in that I simply loved it at the time. Following the disappointment that was “Never Let Me Down”, I considered this a real return to form, a Bowie who didn’t appear to put commercial interests up front anymore. Although far from his very best work, it was at least different and unconventional and “brave” and I was just so glad to have that adventurous Bowie back again. This was the first Bowie album for many a long year not to be played on commercial radio, here in Australia anyways, with JJJ radio one of the few places where the singles could be heard on the airways.

Which is all a bit of a shame, as it really is an excellent album that has aged remarkably well. After a few listens with the volume nice and high, it sounds surprisingly current and suggests it was perhaps a little ahead of the times, especially considering the Grunge sound, a close artist neighbour, was still a few years away from really taking off.

The album opens with “Heaven’s In Here“, supposedly the first thing they wrote together, which rather sets the mood of the whole album. A catchy guitar riff, which quickly goes into all sorts of squealing areas and a constant driving rhythm propels this song along. Bowie’s vocals start quiet and brooding, but by songs end he is screaming frantically. With lots of Gabrels guitar solos, especially at the end, this is the Tin Machine model that’s so dominates the album.

The title track “Tin Machine” comes next and is one of my favourite tracks on the album. It has so much going on with a frantic sound and tempo where you can just imagine the band with their heads down just going for it.  I have no idea what the song is about, so it has that classic Bowie ambiguity that is so endearing (“Working horrors humping Tories, Spittle on their chin“). It does though touch on the subject of “Goons” and has an anti far right-wing political sentiment that runs throughout the album. The band must have been somewhat attracted by the song as they named themselves after it. This was also the second single from the album, backed with a somewhat mediocre live version of Bob Dylan’s “Maggie’s Farm”.

tin machine single

Prisoner Of Love” is my favourite track here and is really is a fantastic song. It’s the closest to a love song on the album, although there is a dark undertone to the song which still gives it that Tin Machine edge. That said, it really is quite beautiful, with the music restrained and Bowie’s vocal performance nothing short of brilliant. The chorus with excellent backing vocals is the most “grandiose” Bowie has sounded for quite some time. This was released as the third single off the album and would have been a huge hit if it had been a Bowie “solo” effort (or indeed recorded by Iggy Pop). Music Video.

prisoner of love

Crack City” is one of those really “direct” moments on the album. Bowie’s scorn at the issue of drugs and the evilness of those “candymen” who peddle this type of death just hits one on the back of the head. Really heard. The music is hard and ferocious but nothing like the lyrics and Bowie’s scathing delivery, which are the most upfront and unambiguously savage in Bowie’s entire career. One gets the feeling after nearly succumbing to drugs and crack cocaine himself throughout the mid 70’s, Bowie and gang felt the need to tell it how it is. With lines such as:

May all your vilest nightmares
Consume your shrunken head
May the ho-ho-hounds of paranoia
Dance upon your stinking bed

Don’t look at me you fuckhead
This nation’s turning blue
Its stink it fouls the highways
Its filth, it sticks like glue”
Well this ain’t no frivolous “Modern Love” that will get you on the dance floor. Not even close.

I Can’t Read” lightens things up a little (relatively speaking anyways) and was Bowie’s favourite track on the album. Bowie laments the inability to read, while he aimlessly changes the channel on the TV in some lonesome existence. The mood and feel of this would have suited the “Low” sessions rather well, although the music is not quite as cutting edge or adventurous. I have to agree with Bowie with this being one of the best moments on the album. Bowie was so endeared with the song that he re-recorded it in 1997 for the film soundtrack to “The Ice Storm” and released that version as a single.

With “Under The God“, we return to the harder side of Tin Machine, with a manic, anti-fascist piece that derides the ugly far-right of UK politics, especially popular with skin-heads and racists at the time (Brexit anyone?). Hard to believe this was written by the same Thin White Duke who dangerously dabbled with far right musings a dozen years previously. “Washington heads in the toilet bowl, Don’t see supremacist hate, Right wing dicks in their boiler suits, Picking out who to annihilate” doesn’t really leave much doubt for their thoughts on the matter and accompanied with a raging rhythm section (not unlike “Lust For Life”) and with Gabrels manic guitar, this track is a real rocker. This was the lead-off single, promoted with a video featuring the band being mobbed onstage by uncontrollable thugs. Music Video.

under the god

Amazing” is one of the quieter moments, a lovely ballad on how amazing life is with someone special, although there’s that slight edge with the concern she might move on to someone else. The guitar work here by Grabrels is particularly exquisite, as are Bowie’s tender vocals and suggests perhaps Tin Machine should have recorded more tracks such as this.

Working Class Hero” is a cover of John Lennon’s classic and fits the anti-establishment feel of the album perfectly. I absolutely love the original Lennon version and is one of my favourite Lennon songs, so it was a thrill to hear Bowie and gang give it a go. Although nothing can beat the Lennon original, this isn’t a bad version with an appropriately sparse arrangement, Gabrels guitar to give it the Tin Machine signature and Bowie’s angry vocal delivery.

Bus Stop” is a fun little ditty about someones skepticism of a religious experience while waiting at the bus stop, which on reflection might just have been a result of last night’s curry. It’s about the only moment of humour on the album, so make the most of its 1 min 43 seconds. The band obviously had fun with this song when on tour, converting it into a bizarre country and western romp.

The next track “Pretty Thing” is a pretty standard rocker, with the rhythm section in charge here with the start/stop arrangement. The best part though is the weird little middle eight section where the track goes off into a different tangent before the long closing sequence, where I’ve always liked the texture Gabrels guitar provides on top of everything.

Video Crimes” is another rocker, with a somewhat stuttering feel that again fits the overall protesting theme of the album, this time lamenting the nasty videos that cause so many issues for society. Bowie plays the part of someone who obviously spends way too much time watching violent movies in his isolated existence and is contemplating “chopping” a few things up himself. It’s imagery on a level far more disturbing than on anything found on the likes of say “Diamond Dogs” or “Low”.

Run” features my favourite Gabrels (albeit brief) solo on the album, although it’s Armstrong’s guitar that features most predominantly on the track (I guess as he co-wrote the thing). I always viewed this as a recommendation on what to do if you ever met the creepy character from the previous song but is really about how Bowie would react if he doesn’t get the girl of his dreams. It’s typically dark and broody but Bowie sounds rather good here. Interestingly, “Run” and the next track “Sacrifice Yourself” didn’t appear on the LP version, no doubt due to space issues, but with most people now buying CDs, Bowie and gang were obviously keen that they be included. The fact the songs are simply not plonked at the end of the album and both have their lyrics in the album notes suggests they are legitimate members of the album proper.

Sacrifice Yourself” as I mentioned didn’t make it onto the LP version of the album and is another somewhat frantic number, with break-neck lyrics that again make references to a God (as in a number of the previous tracks). There’s nothing really that distinguishes this much from other tracks on the album and is one of my least favourite moments.

The album ends with “Baby Can Dance“, which reminds me the most of his previous 1983-1987 period material and could perhaps have fitted in on the “Never Let Me Down” album, where it would have been one of the better tracks. It does have the Tin Machine arrangement, which means upfront drums and lots of squealing guitars, but I’ve always liked this track and makes me wonder what some of the other earlier material would have sounded with Tin Machine playing or if some of the Tin Machine songs had a more commercial shine.

Tin Machine would tour the album extensively, but alas never in Australia (other than a one off, unannounced engagement in Sydney). The shows were generally well received (if you were expecting a Tin Machine experience) and were played in much smaller, more intimate venues than Bowie had played for a very long time. The shows featured no solo Bowie numbers to emphasise this was a real band to be taken seriously, which disappointed many and explained the much smaller crowds. But how I wish I could have attended one of the shows. The somewhat mediocre live album “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” was some consolation although one got a better taste of things with the “Live at the Docks” concert video recorded on 24 October 1991.

oy vey baby

I don’t believe history has done this original “Tin Machine” album justice, often forgotten and ignored as being from that “silly” Tin Machine period. Overall, it’s an album that indeed has a very distinctive edge, with a hardness and rawness that’s kinda unique in the Bowie cannon. The follow-up “Tin Machine II” album has a lot more of a melodic feel than found here with much of the rawness polished away. But this really is an excellent album that rewards with repeat listening.

For many however, this was the point in time when they stopped buying Bowie albums. The older generation often stopped buying albums in general anyways, while the newer generation had new heroes to follow. Which is a shame, as this album provided Bowie the circuit-breaker he needed to ditch his 80’s commercial tendencies and rejuvenate himself into making some truly brilliant solo albums throughout the 90’s and beyond.

The next album in my review will be the first of my top 20 Bowie albums and the first album to come from his 1970’s period. It might be a tad controversial as the next album in my ranking is often regarded as a much loved album from what is widely considered to be Bowie’s best decade of output. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: Tin Machine, Prisoner Of Love, I Can’t Read

22. Reality

reality

Reality” is David Bowie’s 26th studio album and was originally released on 16 September 2003.

The quality of album is beginning to really jump up here with “Reality”, the album that looked for many a long year to be the last Bowie might ever record. Released just a year after his excellent 2002 effort “Heathen”, this was the second Tony Visconti come-back produced album. With a heavy “New York” influence and with some truly excellent tracks, Bowie was in a bit of a swing and producing some really nice new material. In fact, he had consistently been producing good albums throughout the 90’s and 2000’s, although I would rank this as being slightly below par for that period.

The album contained an interesting mix, from full blown rock, to jazzy numbers to some art-rock type pieces right through to basic pop, the album featured a chocolate box of influences and styles. Overall, it was a fine album and the subsequent live performances during the “Reality” world tour featuring much of the album highlighted how Bowie indeed still “had it”. I think Visconti was an overall good influence here, making much of the new material shine and sound as good as it possibly could.

Considering his age (he was 55 when he recorded this album), Bowie was still full of energy and still pushing the boundaries, with a unique world-wide cinema “live” release of the album and a full blown world tour to promote it (including at long long last Australia again !!). However, the overall thread that runs through the album is indeed old age, mortality and how life will eventually come to an end. Sadly.

The album opens with the fabulous “New Killer Star” (Nuclear Star, get it), my favourite track on the album. With imagery of post 2001 New York and a killer riff, this really is classic Bowie and worth price of admission alone. The first single from the album (which sadly and a little surprisingly didn’t chart), the video was a bit disappointing in that it didn’t actually feature Bowie but a series of lenticular images that appear to move as you view them from different angles, showing an astronaut in trouble within his spaceship on an otherwise beautiful day on Earth where it crashes. Music Video.

new killer star

Pablo Picasso“, a cover of a song by The Modern Lovers (who?), is a positive delight. Featuring some nice Spanish-like, distorted acoustic guitar and again the band in a groovy mood, Bowie’s vocals are fabulous here. With hilarious verses and a chorus as catchy as hell, this is one of Bowie’s best ever covers. I love it.

Never Get Old” continues the good form, although I must say since his passing, this song feels altogether different now. A somewhat tongue-in-cheek ditty about how Bowie indeed never looks old (probably all the drugs) and how he will likely just live forever, the music is alive with a great drum/bass/rhythm guitar foundation. Since Bowie indeed never did grow old (69 is way too young) and that he didn’t live forever, the song now has a sadness to it that makes it just a little uncomfortable to listen to now. This was the second single off the album.

never get old

The pace changes significantly with “The Loneliest Guy“, indeed we come to a screaming halt and start to go really slooooooooooooooow here. With Bowie at his most tender, this song feels a little out of place here and sounds more like a soundscape piece from the “1. Outside” album. Featuring an anguished, lonely indeed vocal, a very thin orchestration of sparse piano and weird little soundscapes, Bowie had a lot of fun playing this on his “Reality” tour to see how the crowd would react. Not one of my favourites.

The catchy drum beat and guitar riff reappears with “Looking for Water“, a desperate sounding, thirsty Bowie appears lost in some Middle-Eastern desert. It reminds me just a tiny tad of an old song by the Bowie inspired New Musik called “The World of Water”, if only for the watery theme and clever use of backup vocals. It’s a solid track that was occasionally performed live on the “Reality” tour.

She’ll Drive the Big Car” is about a disillusioned woman from New York who has probably listened to “Always Crashing In The Same Car” too many times (not possible I know, but…) and is contemplating driving her fancy big car into the Hudson River. Bowie’s vocals are a tad distorted here, giving him a slightly unattached feel as he narratives.  It really is a good song that I’ve always just enjoyed.

Days” has almost “country” twang to it, but despite this (I really dislike country music, aaarrrgggg), it’s another really nice, soft song. Bowie sounds wonderful here, as he searches for a friend.

Fall Dog Bombs the Moon” has a great bass line (very common with Visconti produced albums, especially when he’s playing) and is Bowie touching the subject of the Iraq War, a concern for many in 2003, which he does a few times more in the (distant) future.  The lyrics here are particularly good with cutting verses such as “There’s always a moron, Someone to hate, A corporate tie, A wig and a date, Just a dog“. Bowie comes back to this subject on “The Next Day” with tracks such as “I’d Rather Be High” and “How Does The Grass Grow“.

Try Some, Buy Some” written by George Harrison, is one of the weaker moments on the album. It just doesn’t do it for me, with a somewhat lacklustre production and a Bowie vocal that sounds forced and unconvincing. It just sounds dull, which is never a good thing.

The title track “Reality” comes next which lifts both mood and tempo with the “rockiest” track on the album. Bowie sounds both frustrated and sarcastic as he details how we must all face the reality of life. It also comes across as a little biographical as he explains his previous faults and failings “I built a wall of sound to separate us, And hid among the junk of wretched highs, I sped from Planet X to Planet Alpha, Struggling for reality“. This song in particular sounded great live.

The album closes with “Bring Me the Disco King“, a song Bowie has struggled to get right since he first looked at including it on an album way back on “Black Tie White Noise” in 1993. But it wasn’t until “Reality” with Mike Garson’s prominent tinkering jazz inspired piano that Bowie felt confident for it to be released. I’m no great lover of jazz and so for me, this finale just isn’t my cup of tea. However, the lyrics are rather beautiful and again focus on the past and how in the future death beckons. Considering that Bowie is no longer with us, it does have a poignancy that makes for an even more difficult listen now.

So overall, a rather good album and well worth a listen if you stopped listening to Bowie during the 80’s.

There were quite a number of different formats for the album around the general time of it’s initial release. On top of the general single CD release, there was a 2 disc version that included a second CD of extra tracks:

Fly“, a poppy kind of song, with a catchy enough chorus that always reminds me a little of the work of Devo. It’s notable for having Carlos Alomar on guitar, for what would be his last ever appearance on a Bowie album or on stage.

Queen of All the Tarts (Overture)” is actually my favourite piece from the whole “Reality” project. I simply love this song and although it’s clearly unfinished and has lyrics that only repeat the song title, it’s a fabulous Bowie experience. With music that is manic and catchy as all hell, I could quite happily spend a day listening to just these 3 minutes. The song was featured on the “Reality” tour by being played just before Bowie and band took the stage.

Rebel Rebel” (2002 re-recording). The re-worked version is OK, but the original is just so much better. This was the version/arrangement Bowie performed during the opening of  the “Reality” tour

There was also a version of the album that included a bonus DVD of the live performance of the album that was recorded at the Hammersmith Riverside and aired in cinemas all around the world prior to the album release. It also included a bonus track:

Waterloo Sunset“, a cover of the famous song by The Kinks. Of all the covers during the Reality sessions, this along with “Pablo Picasso” work best. Bowie gives a rather lovely, heartfelt performance here and the guitar riff is spot on. Well worth a listen.

Finally, there was yet another version of the album which featured a DualDisc CD/DVD, which included a 5.1 surround sound mix of the album. This mix does indeed sound rather marvellous.

The other track worth a very quick mention is “Love Missile F1 Eleven“, a somewhat forgettable cover of the Sigue Sigue Sputnik hit that featured on the B-Side of the “New Killer Sun” single.

Bowie promoted this album with the excellent and extremely successful “Reality” world tour. It was excellent for a number of reasons, the band were truly fantastic, the set-list was extensive, changed on a daily basis and included some amazing and rarely performed songs (such as “The Bewlay Brothers”, “Fantastic Voyage” and a Ziggy Stardust based finale) and most important of all, because after 17 looooooong years, finally included Australia again. The tour was recorded both on video and as a live album and captures rather well the whole essence of the tour.

I was fortunate enough to get tickets to both Sydney shows and will of course always fondly remember them. But I distinctly remember after the second show thinking I will likely never get to see Bowie live again and although still incredibly pumped, had a sad feeling for many days afterwards.

Later during the European leg of the tour, Bowie suffered a minor heart attack and had to end the tour prematurely. He would never tour again. After the odd appearance here and there (most notably with David Gilmour on his tour in 2006), Bowie slowly disappeared from the public scene entirely. For many a long year, it therefore looked as if “Reality” would be his last ever album.

However, on 8 January 2013 we heard the wonderful news that Bowie had just out of nowhere released a new single and that a new album was on its way. So there were a couple yet of more excellent albums to come from the great man. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: New Killer Sun, Pablo Picasso, Queen Of All The Tarts (Overture)

a reality tour

23. Tonight

bowie tonight

Tonight” is David Bowie’s 16th studio album and was originally released on 1 September 1984.

After the incredible commercial success of both the “Let’s Dance” album and the “Serious Moonlight” world tour, Bowie was under some pressure to come up with a worthy follow-up album. Soon after the tour completion, Bowie hit the studio (Le Studio, Quebec) with much of the same band from the “Let’s Dance” sessions and recorded the oddity that is “Tonight”.

There were a few key changes to the “Let’s Dance” personnel. Nile Rodgers was replaced as producer by Derek Bramble who in turn was replaced during the sessions by Hugh Padgham (well known for his previous work with The Police). Rumour has it Bowie wasn’t happy with how the album was progressing under Bramble and grew tiresome of being asked to sing extra takes when the first one was perfectly OK.

Stevie Ray Vaughan was also gone (he left Bowie acrimoniously before the “Serious Moonlight” tour), replaced on guitar with Derek Bramble and the return of Carlos Alomar. In attendance also was Iggy Pop, who’s writing would feature so predominantly on the album, although he only officially sang co-vocals on the one track.

With most musicians the same, “Tonight” has a similar feel and sound to the monster album that was “Let’s Dance”, which of course was Bowie’s intent. Unfortunately, one gets the distinct feeling that Bowie was more concerned with simply getting something “out there” for the masses to consume, rather than working on an artistic masterpiece as was his norm. Remarkably, he only wrote four new songs for the whole album (the other five tracks were covers) with two of the new tracks co-written with Iggy Pop. In fact Iggy Pop with five writing credits has almost as many writing contributions as Bowie himself.

Of the three EMI 80’s solo albums, “Tonight” is my personal favourite for the simple reason it has a number of tracks that are so much better than found elsewhere in the trilogy, although this album certainly suffers from a few “weaker” moments.

The album opens with “Loving The Alien“, which is an absolutely beautiful, stunning track, one if his best moments of the whole 80’s period. On the subject of religious hypocrisy and conflict, it’s classic Bowie in that the orchestration is eerie, catchy, beautiful and mournful all at the same time. I distinctly remember when I put this album on the turntable for the very first time in my bedroom all those years ago thinking, wow this is going to be a totally amazing album. Sadly, this is the standout best song until we hit the last track. Which is a little frustrating because you can’t but help think what if Bowie only put in the same energies into every track on the album. This was released as the 3rd single off the album and featured one of the very best videos he’s made (and he’s made lots of good ones) full of religious and alien juxtaposition imagery. It’s a must watch. Music Video.

loving the alien

Next comes a cover of Iggy Pop’s “Don’t Look Down“, off his excellent “New Values” album. Bowie transforms the song into an almost reggae piece, likely a Hugh Padgham influence. There are worse covers on this album, but this version doesn’t quite work. The problem with Bowie doing Iggy is that what makes Iggy work is his raw energy and without that, one is often left with just the skin and bones of the song. I often wish Bowie had covered instead “The Endless Sea” off the same album, as it would have suited Bowie a lot more.

God Only Knows” is an iconic Beach Boys song, so to cover such a beast is thwart with danger. Bowie sings it well enough in his best lower register, but the overall arrangement here is dreadful and the song just sounds grand in that pretending, karaoke kinda of way. I don’t believe he’s ever performed this live, so maybe he thought once was probably enough.

Side 1 ends with the title track “Tonight“, a cover of his co-written song with Iggy Pop off the brilliant “Lust For Life” album. Remember what I said earlier about sucking the raw energy out of an Iggy song, well this version leaves behind nothing but a dried up old pip. The original is a wonderfully powerful piece, the last moments spent with a girl dying from a drug overdose, the opening spoken section critical to frame everything. Tina Turner, who sings a barely noticeably duet with Bowie here, refused to include the opening section and the remaining reggae plod of a song is just a shell of the brilliant original. This was the second single off the album and even with Tina Turner on board, couldn’t make the top 50 in the UK. Music Video Live With Tina Turner.

tonight single

So great start, not such a good finish to Side 1.

Side 2 starts with yet another Iggy Pop “Lust For Life” cover, “Neighborhood Threat“. Same rule applies here, with the original so much better but at least this version isn’t weighed down by a dodgy reggae based arrangement. Bowie himself said recording this with the band he had at the time was a mistake. Enough said.

Blue Jean” does pick things up considerably. The only other new track (along with “Loving The Alien”) written solely by Bowie for this album, it’s a fun, catchy and almost “glam-like” in its sound. It certainly isn’t a great song, but it does have that “something” which makes it sparkle upon listening. The opening single off the album, it had a fabulous 20 minute music video “Jazzin’ For Blue Jean” (directed by Julian Temple with whom Bowie would work on “Absolute Beginners”) which is absolutely hilarious. With Bowie playing the part of the nerdy guy trying to get the glamorous girl and also the part of the drugged out rock star Lord Byron, it really is worth watching.   Jazzin’ For Blue Jean Video.

blue jean single

The next track “Tumble and Twirl” is a new track co-written with Iggy Pop and is one of the album highlights. The band really works well here and the almost Latino vibe sounds great, suiting the song which depicts their experiences when visiting Indonesia. It actually has “energy” and a sense that everyone is enjoying themselves here.

The same can’t be said for yet another cover, the Leiber/Stoller standard “I Keep Forgettin’“, although on reflection it’s probably the best cover performance on the album. It’s just not particularly rememberable (pun of course fully intended).

Thankfully the album ends on a high, the truly excellent “Dancing With The Big Boys“, co-written for the album with Iggy Pop and Carlos Alomar. It again highlights just how much better this album could have been with more moments such as these. Featuring the band bashing out a big, loud rhythm and with Bowie and Pop co-singing their panicky concerns for society, Bowie once said this track was the sound he was after with the album and one he hoped to perfect on the next album (he unfortunately failed there). This would have been a far better single than the tragic “Tonight”, but what would I know.

Having just completed a huge world tour in 1983, Bowie wouldn’t tour this album. Instead he next focused on a number of film related projects such as “When The Wind Blows”, “Absolute Beginners” and “Labyrinth”. As such, many of the tracks have never been performed live by Bowie, although thankfully “Loving The Alien” is not among them.

So overall, the album was a mixed bag with some excellent tracks, some OK and some dreadful. It was a hit album though at the time, reaching No 1 in the UK and 11 in the US. But considering the amazing quality of Bowie’s albums to date, it was certainly a concerning dip in the overall quality with both “Let’s Dance” and now “Tonight” not up to the usual Bowie-Universe standard in terms of quality and originality.  Sadly, worse was to come until things picked up with the introduction of the Tin Machine experiment, but that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: Loving The Alien, Tumble and Twirl, Dancing With The Big Boys

24. David Bowie

david bowie 1st album

David Bowie” is David Bowie’s self-titled debut that was originally released on 1 June 1967.

By 1967, David Bowie had already been in the music industry for some 3 long, almost entirely unsuccessful years. He had released quite a number of mainly R ‘n’ B style singles, both with various bands (The King Bees, The Manish Boys, The Lower Third) and as a solo artist. And all had flopped dismally (which is great for us collectors as many are now quite valuable rarities).

Bowie then met Kennith Pitt, who would be his manager during his formative 1967-1970 years and managed somehow to secure Bowie an album contract with the Deram label, who were after someone a tad different to the norm. Pitt was of the belief that R ‘n’ B and rock music in general was not a long term career path and that if Bowie was interested in a future in the music industry, he needed to be an “all-round entertainer” and look at moving towards a more pop, cabaret, “music hall” oriented musical direction.

With his then backing band “The Buzz”, Bowie recorded his first ever album, the self-titled “David Bowie” probably his most bizarre, unBowie-like album of his entire career. If you only know Bowie from his greatest hits, you simply wouldn’t believe this to be a Bowie album. Heavily influenced by the likes of Tommy Steele and especially Anthony Newley (huge at the time and most well-known for his many hits in the late 50’s, early 60’s, starring in films such as “Oliver Twist” and musicals such as “Stop The World, I Want to Get Off”), the album is full of tragic little tales sung in that Anthony Newley London accent. It’s also the most “London” album the Bromley-based budding artist has ever made, with various references to his home town.

The music is pure pop, with weird little musical arrangements and big hall orchestrations, that is as far from conventional rock music as Bowie has ever been. That said, it does sometimes have a hint of the psychedelic child-like writings of Pink Floyd’s Syd Barrett, but without the original out-there spaced-out music that made the first Pink Floyd album such a classic. The rough theme of the album is a collection of quaint little tales, sometimes with a child-like yearning and more often than not, with a tragic element. Many of the songs come and go after a couple of minutes, no 10 minute odyssey here.

I remember where I first bought this album (the sea-side town of Skegness of all places) and after initially being somewhat surprised (shocked) by what I heard, soon grew to love it. And I love it still to this day, this is such a wonderful album that brings back lots of fond memories for me. It’s an album which although has always been critically maligned and which I readily admit is not up there with Bowie’s best, is an album which is very well worth a listen, and who knows, you might grow to like it as well. If I ranked albums more with my heart, then this album would probably be ranked much higher.

The album kicks-off with “Uncle Arthur“, the tale of a mommy’s boy 32 year old adult who finally finds a lovely girl Sally, only to return back to mum because his poor Sally’s cooking isn’t up to scratch. It’s a fun little song that’s typical of the album, but one which is hard to imagine say The Thin White Duke ever singing in 1976.

Sell Me A Coat” is nice, folk ballad that tells of the sadness of a love that is no more. Sadness is a key theme throughout the album, with sweet songs that often convey how things are no longer what they were. If I had to pick the weakest track on the album, this would be it.

Rubber Band” continues this theme, this time the tale of someone in love who goes off to war only to return to find his loved one is now in a relationship with the leader of the local park band. The jealousy and anger of the poor chap can’t but bring a tear to the eye. A version of this song was released as a single in late 1966 and sold about as few copies as all Bowie’s other singles to date. Music Video.

rubber band

Love You Till Tuesday” is a much more “up” song, a simple, quaint love song, in Bowie’s best Newley voice, on how upon meeting a girl promises to stay in love until at least Tuesday. Now that’s commitment , especially for the swinging 60’s. A version with a different vocal track was released as a single shortly after the album release. It was a flop like all his other previous singles.

love you till tuesday single

There Is A Happy Land” is a rather beautiful little song on the joys and pleasures of being a child. But there is a dark undertone regarding how adults can so easily wreak the happy land of childhood. It’s a theme that Bowie touches on a few times, perhaps more eerily and successfully on “After All” from the “The Man Who Sold The World” album.

Bowie goes a little political with “We Are Hungry Men“, how mankind is over populating the planet and unless we do something about it (free contraception pills, mass abortions, infanticide) we’re all doomed. Bowie’s audience (likely in a Bromley pub) have little interest in such measures and decide to eat the boring fear-monger. Gulp, Burp ends the track.

When I Live My Dream” is another lovely love song, this a dreamy romantic overture to a girl who unfortunately has an interest in all too many other boys. He desperately wants the girl but knows the beautiful dream he describes will never come true.

Little Bombardier” is yet another all too sad tale about poor, lonely Frankie Mear, a bombardier scared by war who finally finds friendship and companionship in the form of two children. Just when things are finally going well for the poor chap, the mean arm of authority forces him to leave the town (an adult hanging out with 2 young children, that can’t be healthy), his reputation in shatters, never to return again.

At around this time, Bowie had a keen interest in Buddhism (he even seriously considered moving to a monastery). “Silly Boy Blue” is song about spiritual escapism that evokes imagery of Tibet and butter statues that has a killer bass line throughout.

Come And Buy My Toys” is a nice acoustic number that again evokes imagery of the joys of being a young child and how in the near future one will eventually grow up to the tiredsome responsibilities of adulthood. But for now, you’re still young enough to enjoy the toys on offer.

Join The Gang” is a fun song espousing all the joys of joining a trendy gang, hanging out in pubs and clubs while paying for overpriced crisps and coke drinks. If only a coke was still just 15 bob.

She’s Got Medals” tells the cautionary tale of Mary, a somewhat butch woman who enjoys hanging out with the blokes, joins the army during the war but before they all get wiped out by a bomb,  deserts and decides that the feminine life isn’t so bad after all.

Maid Of Bond Street” is short ditty about a beautiful London based model that has every luxury that life has to offer. Everything that is except the man she really wants, he’s too jealous of her fortunate lifestyle. The arrangements here are just a pure joy.

The final track “Please Mr. Gravedigger“, isn’t really a song at all but a short theatrical piece featuring rain, thunderclaps and the sounds of soil being dug as a serial killer (with a nasty cold) describes why he’s digging the grave of his soon to be latest victim. It’s as hilarious as it’s downright bizarre.

All in all, it really is a fun, lighthearted album that has many surprises and highlights. But alas, a hit it wasn’t meant to be (reaching only 125 on the UK charts), although another album released on the same day did enjoy some commercial and critical success. The other album was “Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band” by a group called The Beatles !! So some stiff competition there.

That said, this album would have to be one of the most re-released and re-packaged albums of all time and over the 50+ years since it’s original release would have sold quite a number. Deram were to drop Bowie after this album failed in the charts but always retained rights to the album. As such, they’ve milked this album for all it’s worth again and again and again. If you were to buy it now, I would recommend the excellent 2CD Deluxe Edition, that includes both original mono and stereo mixes and a CD worth of other tracks from the same period. This years Record Store Day will also release a limited coloured vinyl version of the album, so the milking continues.

It’s worth noting some of the tracks from this period that didn’t make the original track list as there are a number of “classic” Bowie songs among them.

Did You Ever Have A Dream” featured on the B-side of the “Love You Till Tuesday” single and is a joyous ride on the wonder of dreams and how they enable you to go wherever you want to go and be with whoever you want to be with. It’s a return to the theme of dreams and a method of escape from Bowie’s then dreary south London suburbia reality.

When I’m Five” is a truly charming song, beautifully sung with the innocence and wonder of a soon to be 5 year old. It’s one of my favourites from this time period and featured on the “Love You Till Tuesday” film and soundtrack (discussed below).

The London Boys” is arguably the first truly great David Bowie song. Featured only on the B-Side of the “Rubber Band” single, Bowie was a little afraid that the drug references of a Mod trying to survive on the London streets didn’t fit the mood of the album. But it’s a fantastic song, with a performance that really does highlight what a talent Bowie would eventually blossom to be.

The Laughing Gnome” was released as a single just prior to the album and in those days, many singles didn’t make it onto the album. This is probably Bowie’s best known piece during this period, especially so as those cheeky buggers at Deram decided to re-release the single in 1973 at the height of Bowie-mania during the Ziggy Stardust period. To the undoubted embarrassment of the then glam, rock God Bowie, it was a hit and reached No. 6 on the UK charts. Featuring lots of terrible gnome jokes and sped up gnome voices,  it’s one of those songs that’s so bad that it’s almost good. It’s hard not to listen to this without the occasional smile and groan escaping. Bowie would return to the use of multi-speed vocals throughout his career, notably on classic tracks such as “The Bewlay Brothers”, “Fame” and “Scream Like A Baby”. During the 1990 “Sound+Vision” tour where fans were asked to vote for their favourite Bowie song, this got the most votes. Bowie respectfully decided against the wishes of the masses and was never fully performed.

the laughing gnome

The Gospel According To Tony Day” was the B-Side to “The Laughing Gnome” and is a song about a bunch of wankers who pretend to be friends, but really aren’t. We’ve all had some in our lives.

In The Heat Of The Morning” is a slightly more “rock” oriented song than much from this period, although strings are still predominant in the arrangement. A rather charming love song, it’s perhaps most notable as the first song ever produced by Tony Visconti, who would be such a key figure throughout much of Bowie’s subsequent career.

Let Me Sleep Next To You“, is an even rocker track, one which Bowie’s mum didn’t approve of at all as she thought is was a bit “dirty”. Always a good sign me thinks, Bowie is trying to convince a younger girl that she’s now old enough for the “pleasures” of adulthood. Hmmm, maybe Bowie’s mum had a point.

After the commercial failure of the album, Kennith Pitt decided to make a film showcasing much of the album for prospective record labels. The resultant “Love You Till Tuesday” film is a wonderful reminder of the times and is well worth watching. Bowie felt it needed a new song to highlight how he could write a hit and wrote a new song all about Major Tom, an astronaut who get’s lost in space… Trailer Here.

love you till tuesday movie

Once Bowie recorded his next album in 1969 (strangely also self-title “David Bowie”), he very rarely referred to his first album again. Around the year 2000, Bowie recorded the (never officially released) “Toys” album, where he returned to some of these tracks (including Silly Boy Blue, The London Boys, Let Me Sleep Next To You and In The Heat Of The Morning), so he didn’t entirely dismiss this period.

Although I do love this album, it’s fortunate indeed the album was a commercial flop and Kennith Pitt’s plan to mold Bowie into an all-round entertainer failed. It would have been a tragic loss to the rock world if Bowie’s career was destined to be appearances at Christmas pantomimes each year. Phew, we dodged a bullet here.

Unfortunately for Bowie, it would be another 2 years yet until “Space Oddity” would finally give Bowie the hit he had been craving and 5 years until he finally “made” the big time and become an international superstar. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: When I Live My Dream, Join The Gang, Maid Of Bond Street

25. Tin Machine II

tin machine II

Tin Machine II” is David Bowie’s 19th studio album and was originally released on 2 September 1991.

Strictly speaking this is of course the second and final Tin Machine (as in the band) studio album, but if you’re like me, who considers the whole Tin Machine phase just another Bowie persona, then this is effectively another David Bowie album.

After the first Tin Machine album and the general outcry that Bowie being just a member within a hard rock band was at best absurd and at worst just plain ludicrous, many assumed one album would be it. Having gotten things out of his system and attempted to move away from his 80’s era albums as far as is almost imaginable, most thought Bowie would return back to his solo ways, especially after spending much of 1990 on his hugely successful “Sound+ Vision” greatest hits world tour (but no Australia goddammit !!).

But Bowie had other ideas, perhaps to show everyone he won’t again be detracted by popular opinion and perhaps to add legitimacy to what Bowie frustratingly considered his best album in “Tin Machine” for quite some time.

Part of the delay between albums was Bowie trying to find a new record company after EMI clearly had enough of the “just one of the boys” Bowie. They refused to release a second Tin Machine album, so after a bit of shopping around the Victory label finally got the nod.

Recorded over an extended period of time between 1989-91, (although much of it in Sydney, Australia in 1989), “Tin Machine II” retained much of the grit and hard rock edginess of its predecessor. However, unlike the first Tin Machine album, which was just sheer brutality in its delivery, this album had a much more polished finish, with a few more melodies and a lot more subtlety in its sound.

As such, I actually prefer overall the comparative originality and shock value offerings of the first Tin Machine album. At its best, the material on “Tin Machine II” is equally as good (and in a few cases, arguably better) but I just feel this is a less even album with some of the relatively low offerings pulling down the overall album quality. I’m one of the very few people on this planet who loved the first Tin Machine album upon its release and as very good as this album is at times, it doesn’t quite have the thrill value of the first offering. That said, “Tin Machine II” is a much better album than most of the music critics at the time decried.

If Bowie being in Tin Machine wasn’t controversial enough, further controversy ensued with the album cover as it featured 4 nude statues with those naughty, manly dangly bits in full view. Obviously, the guys who work at the censors office hadn’t been to a museum lately, but in some countries, the statues had to be castrated with the good old airbrush. Similar issue to what happened with the original “Diamond Dogs” album, Bowie just seems to get foiled in his attempts to have bollocks on an LP cover.

The album kicks off with the rather excellent “Baby Universal“, bringing back memories of a “Cosmic Being” talking to all the young ones on Earth. It has all the ingredients of a Bowie classic, a driving rhythm, nice touches of guitar, catchy backing vocals, weird little background noises and lines such as “Hallo humans, nothing starts tomorrow”. It was released as the second single and would have been a hit if released as a Bowie solo offering. Music Video.

baby universal

One Shot“, the 3rd single off the album (and the last from Tin Machine) is unfortunately not as good, being a bit ploddy and one-dimensional. It has a drum beat that I could copy, a bit of a nothing guitar solo and an unusually unconvincing vocal by Bowie. There are much better songs on the album, although whether they be single worthy is a different discussion. Music Video.

one shot

We’re back on form with the next track, the wonderful lead off single, “You Belong In Rock n’ Roll“. I’ve always liked Bowie when he starts slow and quietly builds and this is a nice little example. With a steady beat slowly building up, the flourish of Bowie’s sax at the end of each verse is a delight. Bowie’s vocals here sound effortless and are among the best on the album. The band at their finest.  Music Video.

you belong in roll n roll

The cover of Roxy Music’s “If There Is Something” from their brilliant first album is up next. Tin Machine do an OK job of it, but it lacks the energy and spark of the original. The guitar work of Reeves Gabrels is a highlight though and worth investigating for this alone.

In the context of Tin Machine, the next track “Amlapura” is as quiet and gently a song as they recorded. Bowie has a well documented love of Indonesia (he reportedly wanted some of his ashes scattered there) and this song offers a romantic, dream-like landscape of this Indonesian island. It’s actually quiet beautiful and highlights a softer edge to the Tin Machine period which they probably should have explored a tad more. A highlight of their live shows, it’s also a highlight on the album.

Betty Wrong” comes next and probably has the most catchy chorus on the album. To use the word “commercial” might be stretching things a tad, but it does rather have the attributes for this to have been a hit. But only if recorded as a Bowie solo track.  Featuring another excellent Gabrels closing guitar solo, this track (in much extended  form) was one of the highlights of the rather ordinary “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” live album.

You Can’t Talk” is one of my favourites here as it returns to the more conventional Tin Machine sound, with much anguished guitars and frantic lyrics. The chorus (with associated backing vocals) has a nice melody and I don’t know, I’ve always just kinda like it.

With “Stateside” however, we hit a bit of a problem. Perhaps to prove that Tin Machine were really a collective band and not just David Bowie’s backing musicians, the drummer Hunt Sales got to sing on a couple of tracks. This first effort can only be described as pitiful, a dreary, ploddy, entirely boring, forgetful track that brings down the whole album. Thank goodness with CDs you can just hit next.

Shopping For Girls” is the best track on the album. A powerful song about the awful subject of child prostitution, Bowie sounds like the narrator of some shocking documentary, who strews a tide of words and thoughts without barely taking a breath. He can also barely hide his contempt for the guy who “grunts his reply in a garrulous croak, that’s a mighty big word for a nine year old”. There is no way such a song could ever be released as a single, but the haunting melody and shocking content makes this one of the most compelling songs in the Tin Machine cannon.

A Big Hurt” is all just a bit too loud with not enough happening musically or lyrically to hold your interest for long.  As I was thinking through the track list, I almost forgot this track, which kinda says all one needs to know.

Notable for the acoustic guitar sound, a rare thing for Tin Machine, “Sorry” is perhaps more notable for being their worst track. The second song sung by Hunt Sales, it almost makes “Stateside” sound positively brilliant in comparison. Sorry, is of course the perfect title for this sorry mess, but is really is as bad as a Bowie related recording has ever been. I’m trying to think of a worse song in the entire Bowie catalog. I’m get back to you. Where’s the next button on the remote, where where where !!

Goodbye Mr Ed” finishes on a much more positive footing, a really nice song on the subject of farewells. With typical obtuse lyrics, my mental image is of Bowie saying goodbye to America, the “tolerance to violence”,  shopping malls, and the TV show “Mister Ed”. But Bowie was of course saying hello to America about to move across there permanently and live out the rest of his days in New York. So I’m not suggesting this is an accurate mental image 🙂 Bowie was probably just saying goodbye to the whole Tin Machine period.

Hammerhead” is a hidden track that appears just after “Goodbye Mr Ed” that isn’t included in the official track listing. An instrumental jam, I had thought for many years  this was part of “Goodbye Mr Ed” but is the lads just letting off a bit of steam.

“Tin Machine II” is far from being one of Bowie’s best albums. But it’s far better than most of the reviews at the time of release had suggested. There are a number of very fine tracks, far more than the occasional dreadful ones that do indeed lurk in there.

After touring the album with Tin Machine between October 1991 and February 1992 on the “It’s My Life” tour, Bowie seemed to lose interest in the Tin Machine project. There was talk of a third album, but after the poor sales of the admittedly average “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” album, Bowie pulled the pin and went back to his solo career.

Reeves Gabrels would continue to be a key figure throughout Bowie’s work in the 1990’s, when Bowie would record four albums of a much higher caliber than he did throughout most of the 1980’s and with Tin Machine. But Tin Machine was a crucial part of the artistic process in moving Bowie on from the commercial influenced mess in found himself in during the 1983-1987 period and for that alone, we should be thankfully for what he managed to achieve with Tin Machine.

Much much better was to come from Bowie, including future masterpieces, but that’s a story for another day.

oy vey baby