5. 1. Outside

Outside album

1. Outside (The Nathan Adler Diaries: A Hyper-cycle) is David Bowie’s 22nd studio album, originally released on 25th September 1995.

By 1994, Bowie was in a good place. He was happily married to Iman and got his musical mojo back following the commercial success of  “Black Tie White Noise” and the artistic satisfaction that was his “The Buddha of Suburbia” explorations, both from 1993.

After meeting up again with old friend Brian Eno, they decided it was time for them to collaborate again, it having been 16 years since they last worked together on 1979’s “Lodger” album. Bowie was in the mood to record something a little radical again and of course, Brian Eno was always in that frame of mind.

To research the new project, they both visited the Gugging psychiatric hospital near Vienna, Austria and interviewed a number of the patients who were involved in the “Outsider” art movement. Bowie then wrote a short story, based on a pretend diary he was keeping called “The diary of Nathan Adler or the art-ritual murder of Baby Grace Blue: A non-linear Gothic Drama Hyper-cycle.” It tells the sordid story of a dystopian vision of upcoming 1999 in which a new series of crimes were taking place called “Art Crimes”. People were being kidnapped, murdered and their dismembered bodies displayed as bizarre, horrific works of art. The main character on whom the diary was based was Nathan Adler, an art-crime detective on the trail of a serial murder who’s latest victim was a poor 14 year old girl called Baby Grace Blue. With a list of possible suspects, including the probably framed but still main suspect Leon Blank, we are taken on a confused exploration of this nightmarish, futuristic who done it.

The locations have English names such as London and Oxford, but the short story refers to their North American counterparts in Ontario, Canada and New Jersey USA, giving an overall blurred sense of reality.

Without having any real songs developed, Bowie and Eno gathered a team of exceptionally talented musicians to start jamming and bring together musically these various themes. These included the wonderfully eccentric Reeves Gabrels on lead guitar (from his Tin Machine period), the ever reliable Carlos Alomar on rhythm guitar (only survivor from Bowie’s 70’s period when Bowie previously worked with Eno), Erdal Kızılçay on bass and keyboards (who worked with Bowie on both the “Never Let Me Down” and “Black Tie White Noise” albums), Mike Garson on piano (who worked with Bowie during his Ziggy Stardust through to Plastic Soul periods before rejoining the fray again on the previous “The Buddha of Suburbia” album) and who gives the whole album a wonderful vibe and the rather excellent Sterling Campell on drums (who first featured on the “Black Tie White Noise” album and would feature throughout much of Bowie’s remaining years).

In charge of production was Bowie, Eno (for the first time while working with Bowie) and David Richards who first worked with Bowie on Iggy Pop’s wonderful “Blah Blah Blah” album and then co-produced both the “Never Let Me Down” and “The Buddha of Suburbia” albums.

The sessions (initially anyways) consisted mostly of jam sessions, where Eno and Bowie encouraged improvisations through the use of Eno’s famous Oblique Strategy cards where musicians were asked to play as if certain characters or with specific emotions. Lyrically, Bowie would also improvise and return to his well known “cut-up” writing method, but instead of randomising bits of newspaper, magazine or diaries would use a new computer program called the “Verbasizer” to generate random words and phrases for inspiration.

The initial sessions at the Mountain Studios, Montreux were incredible productive, with something like 40 odd tracks developed to various stages of completion. Subsequent recording sessions at the Hit Factory Studios in New York helped to redefine the album with a few more of the accessible tracks (such as “I Have Not Been To Oxford Town“). There has never been an album in which Bowie had so much recorded material available from which to choose.

As with most of Bowie’s so-called “concept albums” (such as Ziggy Stardust and Diamond Dogs), although there’s a thread that ties many of the songs together, there is no clear narrative here, but a collection of indeed non-linear songs and spoken narrative pieces that come from the same surreal universe. Each piece is sung or spoken from the perspective of the characters from the story but it’s a real stretch to say there’s any coherent story as such. “The Phantom of the Opera” or “The Sound of Music” this most definitely is not…

The album opens with “Leon Takes Us Outside“, a short atmospheric piece, with Leon Blank, the prime art-murder suspect, going through a diary and reading out various dates and public holidays as if trying to work out where he was during the following sequence of events.

The music really kicks in with the catchy “Outside“, a track listed as being the album’s “prologue”. Co-written with Kevin Armstrong (a guitarist who’s worked with Bowie on/off since the 1985 Live Aid concert, including as an unofficial 5th member of Tin Machine), it indeed originally dates back as a Tin Machine reject called “Now”. Kevin doesn’t play on this track but he does make a guest appearance on “Thru’ These Architects Eyes“. Campbell on drums is especially good here and with Gabrels screechy guitar and Eno’s electronic soundscapes, sets the mood for what’s to come. Bowie’s vocals are as excellent as always, this time sounding slightly unattached as he laments “The crazed in the hot-zone, The mental and diva’s hands, The fisting of life, To the music outside“. A bright start indeed.

The Hearts Filthy Lesson” is an absolute killer track that dampens the mood considerably. Kızılçay powerful bass dominates with again Gabrels guitar a highlight, as are all the wonderful piano flourishes by Garson. It has a brilliant, industrial style groove that drives the whole track and Bowie (as the Detective Nathan Adler character) introduces us to a number of characters in Paddy (his off-sider) and the somewhat sinister and scary Ramona A. Stone. Bowie sings with a mixture of sorrowfulness and tight anguish (“Heart’s filthy lesson, Falls upon deaf ears” and “I’m already five years older, I’m already in my grave“) as he ponders the case in front of him. One of many many highlights. This was selected as the lead off single, although it’s dark themes made it a less than commercial choice, reaching only No. 35 in the UK charts and just making the US charts at No. 92. The song would have a wider audience when it closed the fantastic movie “Seven” in which it’s dark themes perfectly matches those of both this song and album. Watch the visually disturbing but brilliant video here.

the hearts filthy lesson single

A Small Plot of Land” is another wonderful treasure. Starting with a hypnotic drum pattern and Garson’s dancing piano, it just slowly builds and builds with Bowie’s eerie vocals (sung from the perspective of the residents of Oxford, New Jersey) lamenting the latest art murder victim (“Poor soul, He never knew what hit him and it hit him so“). Gabrel’s guitar solo is another highlight, taking us back to the sounds from the “Lodger” period. It’s just a fabulous track that Bowie would only play live during the following “Outside” tour.

Next comes the first of the spoken segue passages in “Baby Grace (A Horrid Cassette)” that many found irritating but I’ve always thought added another interesting element to the whole album. As eerie soundscapes play in the background, we hear Bowie play the part of the terrified 14 year old Baby Grace Blue via a recording of her last moments before being so viciously murdered. It’s all gruesome stuff but Bowie’s altered vocals gives it a mildly comedic touch.

Things fade before bouncing back again with another of the album’s highlights, the superb “Hallo Spaceboy“. With Sterling pounding drums, Gabrels driving guitar and little Eno flourishes, Bowie sings from the perspective of Paddy as he’s forced to release his suspect. The line “Do you like girls or boys, It’s confusing these days” is of course classic Bowie. Bowie once described the track as Jim Morrison/The Doors playing industrial, heavy metal and that kinda describes things perfectly. It’s really is all rather brilliant. Now I don’t usually go for remixed versions which were the rage at the time (every track seems to have something like 5 different remixed versions), but when released as the third single, Bowie got The Pet Shop Boys to basically re-record and remix the track and I have to say they did a brilliant job, with it being quite different but every bit as good as the original. They also added some additional lyrics “Ground to Major, bye bye Tom, Dead the circuit, countdown’s wrong, Planet Earth, is control on?” which brings the whole piece back to Space Oddity. A latter day Bowie classic, see the excellent video here.

Hallo Spaceboy

The high standard continues with the moody, atmospheric masterpiece that is the “The Motel“. As with many of Bowie’s best tracks, it starts slowly and gently builds up until it reaches it’s thrilling crescendo. Garson is particularly good here, but Eno deserves much credit for the eeriness he manages to achieve. Sung from the perspective of the lamenting luckless suspect Leon Blank (“It’s a kind of living which recognizes, The death of the odorless man, When nothing is vanity nothing’s too slow, It’s not Eden but it’s no sham“) things really takeoff as Blank screams “And there’s no more of me exploding you, Re-exposing you, Like everybody do, Re-exploding you“, while Gabrel’s guitar goes off the scale. Yes, Blank has done some silly things previously, but he’s not guilty of this particularly nasty crime. The tracks then goes all quieter again as it slowly fades away. This would be a key highlight of many a live Bowie concert.

Next comes perhaps the most “poppy”, catchy track off the album “I Have Not Been to Oxford Town“. With a wonderfully contagious bass-line, Alomar’s rhythm guitar and it’s beautifully half-spoken bridges, this is yet another of those Bowie gems that’s worth price of admission alone. Again from the perspective of Leon Blank, he sets the scene (“Baby Grace is the victim, She was 14 years of age, And the wheels are turning, turning, For the finger points at me“), while wrongfully imprisoned in that he hasn’t even been to the scene of the hideous crime (“But I have not been to Oxford Town“). This I think would have made a much stronger lead-off single, but who am I to know any better…

No Control” again leads with a catchy rhythm and weird little keyboard soundscapes as Detective Nathan Adler laments how everything is beyond his control (“Don’t tell God your plans, It’s all deranged, No control“) as he struggles with the case. Bowie’s vocals are again wonderful here and the overall vibe is one in which pop meets a much harder industrial-rock feel.

We next have another segue in which we meet the old, solitary, sad, pathetic “Algeria Touchshriek“, the shop keeper of underground goods and substances. Bowie is at his most hysterical here with a distorted older man’s voice that’s hard to take too seriously, although it’s clear this pervert is a possible suspect in all the wrong doings (“I’m thinking of leasing the room above my shop, To a Mr. Walloff Domburg, A reject from the world wide Internet, He’s a broken man, I’m also a broken man“).

The Voyeur of Utter Destruction (as Beauty)” is yet another highlight (yes, there are a lot of them in this album). With another catchy, driving, pulsing rhythm and brilliant vocal performance by Bowie, we’re introduced to the menacing, mysterious Artist/Minotaur character who did the evil deed (“The screw, Is a tightening Atrocity, I shake, For the reeking flesh, Is as romantic as hell“). The outro is just wonderful as the music builds up and Bowie’s distorted vocals wail “Call it a day, today… t t“.

We next finally meet the sinister Ramona A. Stone who has been previously mentioned a number of times in the “Ramona A. Stone/I Am with Name” segue. Bowie’s spoken vocals are wonderfully spooky here merging seamlessly with the “I Am with Name” portion being an actual “song” with a thumping drum and all sorts of weird musical flourishes in the background.

Wishful Beginnings” is certainly uncomfortable listening and the most spookiest track on the album. With a repeating loop of drums and evil cackle laugh, it’s musically the least interesting contained within. Bowie’s sad, apologetic vocal as the Artist/Minotaur commits the murder (“The pain must feel like snow, I’m no longer your golden boy, Sorry little girl“) makes it an even harder listen. For me, this is the weakest moment on the album and it’s interesting that it’s been left out on a number of the subsequent re-releases. As far as I know, it has never been played live and is definitely NOT a dance floor filler…

We Prick You” picks things up nicely again, with this marvelously contagious track thanks to it’s fast paced rhythms and Eno inspired soundscapes. This is one of my favourite Bowie vocals on the album, with some lovely little touches throughout such as when the backup vocals chime in with “I wish you’d tell, I wish you’d tell“. Sung from the perspective of the Members of the Court of Justice, they’re basically giving Leon Blank a hard time during his trial and demand the truth or else (“Tell the truth, We prick you we prick you we prick you“). Put this one down on the Bowie/Eno list of gems.

Nathan Adler” (segue 1) is a short little spoken piece with Bowie doing his best Humphrey Bogart impression as Detective Nathan Adler as he ponders who might be the murderer. With a basic little rhythm in the background, it’s perhaps the most dispensable moment on the album.

I’m Deranged” is the Artist/Minotaur character admitting all this nastiness is happening basically because they’re a deranged monster (“And the rain sets in, It’s the angel-man, I’m deranged“). As with previous Bowie’s musings, the subject of insanity and derangement often reoccurs. Musically, the backdrop is again another fast rhythm piece with Eno’s soundscapes and Garson’s tinkering piano piecing the whole thing together. Bowie’s lamenting vocals are as beautiful and chilling as ever on the album.

Thru’ These Architects Eyes” right near the end of the album is for me THE highlight. Musically, it has every possible ingredient for a Bowie classic, a wonderfully powerful rhythm, a catchy chorus, some magical musical soundscapes thanks to Eno and Garson’s piano, some great guitar work and a cryptic, thought provoking lyric. And of course a superb Bowie vocal performance. Sung nominally as Leon Blank, it doesn’t quite play I think into the album narrative but with lines such as “Cold winter bleeds, On the girders of Babel, This stone boy watching the crawling land, Rings of flesh and the towers of iron, The steaming caves and the rocks and the sand“, who cares really. I’m not entirely sure what my Top 20 Bowie tracks are but I would be mightily surprised if this isn’t one of them.

The second short “Nathan Adler” segue has the detective lamenting the relationship between Ramona and Leon. OK, perhaps this might be the most dispensable moment on the album,

Strangers When We Meet” finishes the album and comes as a bit of a surprise as it’s simply a re-recording of the track found on the previous “The Buddha of Suburbia” album. Although I think it’s a vastly improved version, it comes across as a little unnecessary and again doesn’t really fit into the album narrative. Although supposedly from the perspective of Leon Blank, I’ve always viewed this as simply Leon doing a Bowie cover while trapped in prison. I can only think Bowie must have really have liked this track and found it frustrating that not many would have listened to it and was keen for it to be more widely heard. Even more so as it was chosen as the second single off the album, an odd choice as either “I’ve Not Been To Oxford Town” or “Thru’ These Architects Eyes” would have been stronger choices. It only managed to reach No. 39 on the UK charts, watch the video here.

strangers when we meet single

The album cover features a recent self-portrait called “The DHead – Outside” painted in 1995. Bowie was starting to get quite serious about his paintings and this was one of a series of 6 self-portraits he made at around this time. The CD packaging came with a series of bizarre images of Bowie (often barely recognisable) as the various characters from the album, along with liner-notes detailing the short-story written by Bowie of the “non-linear” plot.

This album is beyond doubt a latter day Bowie masterpiece and the album which really does deserve the distinction of being his best since the “Scary Monsters and Super Creeps” album (often considered by many as his last true great album).

The final result was an album simply jam packed full of ideas, both musically and lyrically, even though at nearly 75 minutes long it was Bowie’s longest studio album by far. At the time, it was only released on CD format, had it been released on vinyl it would easily have been a double-album. Bowie was at his very best, creating music that stretched the boundaries artistically but had enough commercial appeal to be more than just niche value.

The music critics at the time had a hard job making sense of it all and gave the album mixed reviews. Many saw it as a return to form by Bowie but generally considered it all a little long, with many of the segue pieces in particular as unnecessary or overly pretentious. While I understand that narrative, I in the main disagree. I see this as somewhat like The Beatles “White” album, in that yes there are bits better than others but it just works as a wide collection of different, often unusual musical pieces. As not unusual with Bowie, more people have come on board since it’s original release and is now more often given the recognition it so richly deserves.

Bowie toured the album between September 1995 through to February 1996, but only included dates in North America and Europe (sadly it never came to Australia, I’m still not entirely over the disappointment). In North America, Bowie toured with NIN, Trent Neznor being a huge Bowie fan. It was a perfect fit, with the Outside album having a very NIN, industrial rock vibe to it all. NIN opened the show with a set, then shared the stage with Bowie where they played a number of songs together (often “Subterraneans”, “Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps)”, “Reptile”, “Hallo Spaceboy” and “Hurt”), before Bowie performed his solo set. Seriously how good would that have been !! Although sadly there was no official releases of these shows, there were a number of excellent “unofficial” releases from this period.

Bowie NIN live album

Over the years, there have been a number of versions and re-releases of the album. The Japanese release included a bonus track that was subsequently included in other re-releases:

Get Real” is a decent enough track, with a much more pop vibe than found on most of the album. With a hooky chorus (“I’m scared to touch, too tense to be undone, I walk the streets not expecting morning sun“), it belongs more I think on previous albums such as “Black Tie White Noise” than on here. It’s hard to imagine where it would fit within the construct of the final Outside album.

The following year (1996), “1. Outside Version 2” was released, with the track “Wishful Beginnings” replaced at the end with the Pet Shop Boys version of “Hallo Spaceboy”. It also contained a second CD of bonus tracks consisting of mainly various live versions.

I would recommend trying to get hold of the excellent if unimaginatively titled “David Bowie” box set released originally in 2007 which contains expanded versions of all the Bowie albums released by Sony (Outside, Earthling, Hours, Heathen and Reality). The Outside set includes an extra CD full of various remixed track versions as well as “Get Real” and another unreleased track from the Outside sessions:

Nothing to Be Desired” is more of a chant than a song, with a driving rhythm plugging away as Bowie’s vari-speed vocals chants away in the main with “Mind changing“.  This very much has a feel with the rest of album, with Leon struggling with the effects of drugs in his system (or so I’ve always felt).

David Bowie Box

 

Bowie had originally planned for Outside to be the first of a series of albums he was to release with Eno up to the new millennium (hence the title “1. Outside“). The follow-up album was rumoured to be called “2. Contamination“, with enough spare material already recorded to further expand and explore the Nathan Alder universe. However, 1996 came and went and it eventually became obvious that Bowie (and Eno) had sadly abandoned the project when in 1997 Bowie released his new album “Earthling” that contained no Eno and no art-ritual murders. It was a big ask for Bowie, who is notorious for getting bored quickly, to commit to a 5 year project.

I know I’ve said this a number of times in my album reviews, but I do consider “1. Outside” to be Bowie’s genuinely most under-rated album, perhaps buried under the weight of the story and overall concepts. Although the album sold respectably, especially considering its somewhat dark and bizarre content (reaching No. 8 in the UK and No. 21 in the US), I’ve always felt it’s never received the true recognition it deserves. That being a true Bowie masterpiece that contains so many ideas and so many incredible pieces of music, that the overall concepts become almost irrelevant. It’s a magical, wild 75 minute ride that is among the best work Bowie has ever produced. It’s an album which I have never tired of listening from start to finish.

Bowie has always been interested in writing albums that are more than just a collection of songs. Some of Bowie’s very best works are those where there’s a strong thread or concept or surreal story-line that ties the whole piece together. I’ll mention some of these albums later, but that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: “Thru’ These Architects Eyes“, “I Have Not Been to Oxford Town“, “Hallo Spaceboy“.

17. Earthling

Earthling

Earthing” is David Bowie’s 23rd studio album and was originally released on 3rd February 1997.

After releasing the epic “1. Outside” album in 1995, the original idea had been to release a new album each year up until the new millennium, continuing the concept of Nathan Adler and the “art crimes”, finally solving who the horrid murderer was with album number 5. But in typical Bowie fashion, Bowie (and Eno) soon tired of the idea and 1996 came and went without any sign of a follow-up album (that had been muted to be called “2. Contamination”).

Bowie spent much of the intervening time touring the “1. Outside” album (but never in Australia Goddammit !!). On the US leg of the tour, Nine Inch Nails opened for/with Bowie, with Trent Razor admitting a number of times of being heavily influenced by Bowie. The tour had a very hard and gritty sound (the Outside album was no light-pop record), with Bowie listening to much of the electronica and drum & bass type music that was breaking at the time (with acts such as The Prodigy, Goldie, Underworld).

Bowie on his next album wanted to capture both the sound he was creating while on tour and the drum & bass, Jungle influences that were just on the cusp of becoming mainstream. The result was the album, “Earthing“, featuring his touring band at the time (minus Carlos Alomar).

The internet was still relatively new at the time, with Bowie at the forefront with his presence on the web thanks to his pioneering website. Through the website, Bowie asked his internet fans which album title to go with, “Earthling” or “Earthlings” (I know I know, it was such a difficult and hugely vital decision). More revolutionary though was Bowie releasing the first single “Telling Lies” initially as a downloadable only single, the first prominent “mainstream” act to do so. Bowie at the time predicted that in the future, downloading music would be the norm, a predication that was generally ridiculed back in 1997.

At the time I felt a tad disappointed with the album, mainly because I loved the “1. Outside” album so so much and wanted Bowie to continue the Nathan Adler concept adventure with Eno, but also because I felt Bowie was trying here to catch up with what was currently trendy, rather than set the trends himself. My disappointments have since mellowed and I concede that “Earthling” is indeed one very fine album, with Bowie taking many of these influences and making a musical statement that was very much his own.

The band Bowie has on board here really is fantastic, led again by Reeves Gabrels and ably supported by Mike Garson, Gail Ann Dorsey, Zack Alford and Mark Plati. Well practised having toured together for months, they collectively really rock when required but also sounded positively fresh and contemporary in the overall sound they generated.

I first bought this album at a record store in Sydney with the bloke who served me saying that this new Bowie album sounded pretty darn good. He was about 18 years old and I distinctly remember thinking that Bowie could still connect with the young’uns. Not bad for someone who had gone past the 50 years of age mark.

The album cover was quite brilliant, Bowie with red hair in his striking Alexander McQueen burnt up Union Jack coat, his back towards us as he gazes across a super bright vista of the English countryside. It’s actually one of my all-time favourite album covers.

The musical contents inside were also rather good, starting with “Little Wonder“, the second single off the album. Perhaps the most direct and obvious example of the drum & bass sound associated with the album, the track has all the frantic power and energy necessary to pull it all off. As with much of the album, the lyrics are obscure with Bowie back using the “cut-up” technique to write lyrics, but this time time with a computer program rather than a newspaper and pair of scissors. With a nod to the seven dwarfs (they all get a mention) and with a number of self references, Bowie sings with an earnest “Englishness” style that makes the listener wonder whether he’s really being serious or just having a laugh. The video accompanying the single features a spooky looking Bowie with a number of alien looking beings, including a re-incarnated Ziggy Stardust like character jumping around dingy parts of New York. Music Video.

little wonder

With a backdrop of strange buzzing sounds, rhythmic “fairground” keyboards and a chugging drumbeat, “Looking For Satellites” is the clearest example of Bowie’s cut-up writing technique. With lyrics collected from apparently random satellite TV channels (“Nowhere, Shampoo, TV, Combat, Boy’s Own, Slim tie, Showdown, Can’t stop“), Bowie chants rather than sings the chorus, before the verses kick in and the blast of “SATELLITES” !! The thing is, as odd as the components might be here, it all works so perfectly together resulting in a brilliant, late-Bowie classic.

The quality continues with “Battle For Britain (The Letter)“, where we return to the album’s predominant drum ‘n’ bass sound. With obtuse, cut-up lyrics which always makes me think of Bowie reminiscing of his rainy homelands, Bowie sings the verses in an English deadpan manner while the choruses sound almost anguished in comparison. With excellent contributions of manic guitars and keyboards from Gabrels and Garson, this really is a great track. One of many undiscovered treasures in Bowie 90’s cannon of work.

Seven Years In Tibet” is a much more sombre affair, with the quiet opening  “Are you OK?, You’ve been shot in the head, And I’m holding your brains, The old woman said” as dark as anything Bowie has ever penned. The music however explodes out of the speakers with the crunching chorus line of “I praise to you, Nothing ever goes away“, making for a thoroughly thrilling, if somewhat uneasy ride. Bowie’s contempt for the plight of those in Tibet is re-enforced by the (surprisingly effective) version sung in Mandarin that Bowie released as a single in some regions. Bowie has a long history and keen interest in Buddhism, almost going for the shaven head look and lifestyle in the late 60’s. This track is yet another Bowie classic that many have never heard before.

seven years in tibet

The following track “Dead Man Walking” has a title that suggests the solemn mood continues, but the music is positively uplifting in comparison. It’s one of the more “conventional” tracks on the album, a catchy tune with the out there instrumentation more subdued. As a result, it’s not one one my favourites here, although it was selected as the album’s third single.  Watch the somewhat bizarre video here directed by Floria Sigismondi (who would work with Bowie again on videos from “The Next Day” album).

Telling Lies” has a place in history, being one of the very first downloadable tracks from a major artist. Indeed, it was the first downloaded song I ever purchased. The first single off the album, I’ve always considered this one Bowie’s best “lesser known” singles. The manner in which Bowie sings the agonised “Telling Lies” refrain is worth price of admission alone. In this post Trump world, it sadly has even more relevance today than it did back in 1997.

telling lies

The Last Thing You Should Do” is my pick of the least interesting track on the album, which if rumours were true only made it onto the album at the last minute. Again, featuring the drum ‘n’ bass / jungle sound, it’s a little pedestrian with a somewhat flat vocal performance. Bowie sounds a little bored here, which is not a usual singing style for Bowie at all.

I’m Afraid Of Americans” however is altogether different and a definite highlight here. Co-written with Brian Eno during the “Outside” sessions, it’s a somewhat cynical and paranoiac view of the typical white, gun loving American male. It’s a real rocker of a song and was great when performed live. This was predictably a top 20 hit in Canada !! Released as the fourth and last single off the album, the video is brilliant and features NIN’s Trent Reznor (who remixed this version of song) as Johnny, the crazed American. It’s well worth a watch. Music Video.

Im afraid of americans

The final track “Law (Earthlings On Fire)” is a bit of a weak affair. It features odd instrumentation and an odd vocal that reminds me in parts just a tad of “Ricochet” from “Let’s Dance”. The refrain with Bowie singing the song title is the best part here, but it only takes one so far.

Bowie would tour the album with basically the same band as recorded the album (minus Mark Plati) throughout much of the later half of 1997 (although yet again not in Australia Goddammit !!). Bowie would also perform a number of the songs during his fantastic 50th Birthday show at Madison Square Gardens.

The album was re-released in 2004 as a 2 disc version, featuring a second CD of remixed versions but sadly no new notable outtakes.  I though would recommend getting this as part of the excellent value for money “David Bowie” boxed set.

Although not reaching the highs of the previous superb “1. Outside” album, overall, “Earthing” really is an excellent album with lots of wonderful, quirky highlights. As with much of his 1990’s output, it’s a sadly underrated effort and one of the often forgotten gems in the Bowie cannon.

Bowie would go on to make several more brilliant, quirky, underrated albums and a few that indeed got all the credit they deserved, but that’s a story for another day.

18. Hours

hours

Hours” is David Bowie’s 24th studio album and was originally released on 21st September 1999.

This was the last Bowie album of the 1990’s and continued his trend of releasing throughout the decade a number of truly excellent, generally under-rated works. “Hours” is another hidden gem in the Bowie cannon which is full of wonderful, thought-provoking material, well worth a visit if you haven’t had the pleasure yet of listening to it.

Co-written with Reeves Gabrels, his ex-Tin Machine comrade and collaborator throughout much of the 1990’s, the album started life as the soundtrack to the computer game “Omikron: The Nomad Soul“. For a computing geek, I never really got much into computer games but I remember at the time getting a copy of Omikron and trying to get it to run on my then Windows NT laptop. It was a really fun game where you interact in a complex world while taking over various characters, fun that is until I got stuck trying to get past a heap of guards near the end before finally giving up. The game featured much of the music from what would eventually be the “Hours” album, including a few “live” performances by “The Dreamers” (a band based on Bowie, Gabrels and his then live bass player, Gail Ann Dorsey), playing in various dodgy bars throughout Omikron.

Omikron

A computer game soundtrack by the great David Bowie sounds pretty remarkable, that is until you realise just how much interest Bowie had in computing, the internet and with all the possibilities that the web had to offer. It’s easy to forget that Bowie was one of the internet pioneers, being one of the first to fully realise how downloading music would be the future, one of the first to have a full blown, interactive internet site and ISP services, one of the first of offer a commercial song “Telling Lies” as a download and one of the first to offer an entire album as a downloadable option here with the “Hours” album. David Bowie was awarded The Webby Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007 for his pioneering contributions to music within the internet.

With the end of yet another decade fast approaching and with Bowie now in his 50’s, “Hours” is one of the most nostalgic, backwards yearning albums of his career. I distinctly remember at the time thinking that Bowie was actually getting “older”, really for the first time. He looked a little older, especially in this videos from the album, sounded a little older and indeed touched on his past in a way that an older person would reminisce of days gone by. This is all the more enhanced by the album cover, that has a (possibly dying) Bowie being comforted by a younger looking “angelic” Bowie.

The music touches on various previous parts of Bowie’s career, although in typical Bowie style it still sounded fresh and new. At the time, some critics mentioned it being a relative to the “Hunky Dory” album, but it’s not really a view I share. I’ve always thought there are references here to his glam period, his Berlin trilogy and indeed to his more recent material. But it most certainly didn’t sound too much like his previous drum ‘n’ bass frantic “Earthling” album, this generally being much mellower and quieter in scope.

The album kicks off with “Thursday’s Child” which was also the lead off single from the album (in most territories). It’s one of those quieter, dreamy songs so typical of the album, which has a rather lovely melodic feel. Bowie sings in his best “fragile” voice with a gorgeous chorus that just takes you away. A truly beautiful song. The video features Bowie staring at himself in the mirror and thinking when he was with a younger version of his partner. Music Video.  As with many releases at the time, there were a number of different versions of the CD single, which in turn featured different B-Sides to collect. It’s an expensive business being a Bowie fan, I’ll cover the B-Sides later on.

thursdays child

Something In The Air” is another cracking song, this time featuring a much more “electronic” sound, full of weird little noises and with a somewhat distorted Bowie lead vocal. As with much of the album, Bowie seems to feel that things are no longer what they once were and there’s a certain unease with what’s going on here. This song is probably the closest on this album to what he had previously recorded on the “1. Outside” and “Earthing” albums. Gabrel’s lead guitar and the strange sounds he can get out of it is on display the most here.

Survive” is another lovely song, with another sad, vulnerable vocal on which Bowie says he’ll survive but sounding as if he’ll do anything but now that a love is lost. Gabrel’s guitar line here really is excellent and the overall track is just sublime. For me, it makes me think just a little of the “Station To Station” album. This was the seond single off the album and featured a clever video of Bowie floating around the kitchen table. Music Video.

survive

If I’m dreaming My Life” is perhaps my favourite track on the album, although there are several possible candidates. A long brooding piece, it starts typically slow before spending up before each catchy, rhythmic alternate verse, with Bowie wondering if his life and that girl of his was all just one long dream. Gabrels features predominantly throughout with various guitar flourishes, including during the long coda section at the end. At 7 plus minutes, it’s one of the longer pieces Bowie has recorded and although no “Station To Station”, it’s still an excellent track. Bowie performed a nice version of this on his appearance on “VH1 Storytellers” (more on this later).

Seven” on the other hand is one of the weaker moments on the album. Released as the third and last single off the album (with again with so many different versions I almost lost count), it’s a rather basic acoustic track with a slide guitar line that’s all very nice but just doesn’t do it for me. “Seven” was also performed as part of Bowie’s “VH1 Storytellers” appearance. Video link to Seven on Storytellers.

Seven BlueSeven Purpleseven green

What’s Really Happening?” has an interesting story. As a promotion on “BowieNet”, Bowie’s internet fan club,  a competition was run for some lucky bugger to write lyrics for a new song that would appear on this album. Out of 20,000+ entrants, the winner was Alex Grant and the result was this track. As some consolation for all those who missed out, the recording of the track was webcast “live” on the internet for BowieNet members. The lyrics although not “Lennon-esque” (or Bowie level quality for that matter) do suit the tone of the album and I’ve always enjoyed the track with its fuzzy guitars and electronic rumblings.

The rocker of the album is definitely “The Pretty Things Are Going To Hell” and is a definite highlight. With little glimpses back to his Glam-Rock era and with Gabrels sounding not unlike Mick Ronson, Bowie is in vintage form here and the track has a rare swagger not found elsewhere on the album. Although Grabels guitar is most predominant, the excellent bass- line by Mark Plati deserves credit and helps to drive the track along. The lead-off single here in Australia, a remixed version of the song featured on the “Stigmata” film soundtrack. Video Performance.

pretty things are going to hell

New Angels Of Promise” is the song I most associate with the Omikron computer game and it’s the song featured at the very start. I’ve always loved this song as it has much of the ingredients of a classic Bowie track, with a wonderful mix of weird electronic instrumentation, a thumping rhythm and that somewhat distorted Bowie vocal delivery. With a hint towards the first side of the “Heroes” album, if you enjoy 70’s Bowie you’ll very likely enjoy this.

Brilliant Adventure” is even more of a hint towards the “Heroes” album, this time the B-side with this being the only instrumental on the album. With a strong Japanese vibe thanks to the featured koto, it echoes back to both “Moss Garden” and “Crystal Japan” from his past. Considering the strong influence and background of the “Omikron” soundtrack, it’s perhaps a little surprising that there weren’t more instrumentals featured on the album. Personally I find this track a little ho-hum and not as interesting as the aforementioned influences.

The album proper closes with the excellent “The Dreamers“, an atmospheric piece and one of my favourite Bowie vocals on the album. “The Dreamers” is the name of the fantasy Bowie band in the Omikron computer game, although the song itself is a somewhat obscure piece detailing dark dreams and shadows. Bowie’s vocals are again slightly distorted but he still hits the big notes impressively. A very satisfactory end to an overall highly satisfactory album.

Although the album was a typical hit in the UK, reaching No. 5 in the charts, it was however the first non-Tin Machine (or “Buddha of Suburbia” soundtrack album) not to make the Top 40 in the US since way back to the Ziggy album, only reaching a disappointing 47. Which is a pity, because this really is a wonderful album, that had a very modern feel for 1999 and I think would actually appeal to many in the US market.

At the time of release, as well as the standard packaging, a limited edition version featuring a lenticular cover kept us Bowie collectors happy. I would though recommend trying to get hold of the “David Bowie” box set which featured all the albums released between “1. Outside” and “Heathen”, each with a 2 CD package featuring various re-mixes, B-Sides and bonus tracks from each album. With regard “Hours”, this included the other four original tracks that were released as B-sides on various versions of the “Thursday’s Child” singles:

We All Go Through” has a Tin Machine feel during one of their quieter moments, but overall the track is kinda bland and forgettable. In other words, a perfect B-Side track.

1917” on the other hand is brilliant, one of those hidden Bowie gems and my favourite piece from the whole “Hours” sessions. A thoroughly weird little electronic-based instrumental, it reminds me just a little of the A-Side of the “Low” album, especially with that half finished feeling in how the track comes and then quickly disappears again.

We Shall Go To Town” is a somewhat sombre piece, with an almost tortured vocal by Bowie who sounds positively in pain throughout. Gabrel’s guitar solo sounds akin to him trying to throttle the thing, not unlike Bowie and his saxophone throttling Neukoln piece from “Heroes”. Although I might not have sold this too well, it’s actually a great track and a million miles from his 80’s stuff.

No-One Calls” is another down beat track with a somewhat hypnotic, repetitive, electronic/keyboard based arrangement, with Bowie singing in his best dour voice. Not a classic perhaps, but again perfect B-side fodder.

Soon after the release of “Hours”, Bowie and Gabrels went their separate ways, ending a 10 years working relationship and the end of a productive, generally underrated period of Bowie’s career. Their last performance together was on 23 August 1999 when Bowie performed live on VH1 Storytellers which featured “Thursday’s Child”, “Seven”, Survive” and “If I’m Dreaming My Life” from “Hours” among other classics from Bowie’s career. An album/DVD of the show was released some 10 years later on 6 July 2009.

storytellers

Bowie performed a very small low-key tour of just 8 live shows to promote the album. Gabrels was replaced on guitar by Page Hamilton with the tour setlist usually including “Thursday’s Child”, “Survive”, “Something In The Air”, “Seven” and “The Pretty Things Are Going To Hell” from the album.

With “Hours” we close off the 90’s and arguably Bowie’s most underrated period of his career. Bowie would move on into the new millennium and create two more high quality albums before his long 10 year break following his heart attack. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: Thursday’s Child, If I’m Dreaming My Life, 1917

21. Tin Machine

tin machine album

Tin Machine” is David Bowie’s 18th studio album and was originally released on 22 May 1989.

Although officially the first of two albums by the band “Tin Machine” of which Bowie was but one humbled member, for those of you who consider the whole Tin Machine period to be just another Bowie persona, this is for all intents and purposes another Bowie studio album.

By the end of the 80’s, Bowie was in a difficult place. His last album “Never Let Me Down” was universally panned by the critics (I rated it as his worst album and artistic nadir). His “Glass Spiders” world tour of 1987, although commercially successful, was likewise viewed a critical failure, often deemed just too over-bloated and over-the-top in its production (I personally loved the shows precisely because of its theatrical values). Bowie himself felt he was struggling artistically at the time, from 1983’s “Let’s Dance” onwards if truth be told. Bowie was even considering if he actually had a future left in music and whether he should focus on acting, directing or just putting his feet up living the high life with his now considerable wealth. In the end, Bowie took a different path entirely.

After being reacquainted with the Sales brother (Tony on bass and Hunt of drums), who he had worked with in 1977 during the making of Iggy Pop’s brilliant “Lust For Life” album (next time you watch “Trainspotting”, that brilliant rhythm during the song” Lust For Life” is the Sales brothers in action), they decided to work together again on the next Bowie project. Bowie also enlisted the services of Reeves Gabrels, suitably impressed when Bowie’s then publicist suggested he should check out her husbands guitar playing. Kevin Armstrong, who had worked with Bowie on a number of occasions previously (most notably on Iggy Pop’s excellent “Blah Blah Blah” album) plays rhythm guitar throughout, but was not “officially” a member of the band.

Together, they recorded one of the most controversial albums of Bowie’s career, not only because of it’s relative “rawness” and very hard rock content but also because Bowie wanted this released not as a solo project, but as a collective band effort. Bowie also insisted it be a democratic band, in that he was simply just one member of the gang, so the band photo on the cover had Bowie as the most distant member (and what the hell, was that facial hair on Bowie !!). Bowie wasn’t mentioned anywhere on the album cover, this was a Tin Machine album.

At the time, the music itself was actually quite well received, but the notion of Bowie being just a member of the band was generally ridiculed, which I can’t help thinking consequently impacted the overall reputation of the album itself.

Overall the music is dark and can only be categorised as heavy/hard rock, the “hardest” album Bowie has recorded since 1970’s “The Man Who Sold The World”. The “Tin Machine” album though is much “trashier” in sound and much less compromising in its take no prisoners approach, with frequent swearing and direct, unambiguous lyrics. Considering his previous album was the soft rock/pop of “Never Let Me Down”, this couldn’t be more different and confrontational, especially for his then Phil Collins-type fan base he had accumulated during the 80’s. Although there is no Iggy Pop at all on the album (unlike the previous 3 albums), this sounds soooo much more like authentic Iggy Pop than anything Bowie had managed to record so far.

I remember vividly when I first bought this album in that I simply loved it at the time. Following the disappointment that was “Never Let Me Down”, I considered this a real return to form, a Bowie who didn’t appear to put commercial interests up front anymore. Although far from his very best work, it was at least different and unconventional and “brave” and I was just so glad to have that adventurous Bowie back again. This was the first Bowie album for many a long year not to be played on commercial radio, here in Australia anyways, with JJJ radio one of the few places where the singles could be heard on the airways.

Which is all a bit of a shame, as it really is an excellent album that has aged remarkably well. After a few listens with the volume nice and high, it sounds surprisingly current and suggests it was perhaps a little ahead of the times, especially considering the Grunge sound, a close artist neighbour, was still a few years away from really taking off.

The album opens with “Heaven’s In Here“, supposedly the first thing they wrote together, which rather sets the mood of the whole album. A catchy guitar riff, which quickly goes into all sorts of squealing areas and a constant driving rhythm propels this song along. Bowie’s vocals start quiet and brooding, but by songs end he is screaming frantically. With lots of Gabrels guitar solos, especially at the end, this is the Tin Machine model that’s so dominates the album.

The title track “Tin Machine” comes next and is one of my favourite tracks on the album. It has so much going on with a frantic sound and tempo where you can just imagine the band with their heads down just going for it.  I have no idea what the song is about, so it has that classic Bowie ambiguity that is so endearing (“Working horrors humping Tories, Spittle on their chin“). It does though touch on the subject of “Goons” and has an anti far right-wing political sentiment that runs throughout the album. The band must have been somewhat attracted by the song as they named themselves after it. This was also the second single from the album, backed with a somewhat mediocre live version of Bob Dylan’s “Maggie’s Farm”.

tin machine single

Prisoner Of Love” is my favourite track here and is really is a fantastic song. It’s the closest to a love song on the album, although there is a dark undertone to the song which still gives it that Tin Machine edge. That said, it really is quite beautiful, with the music restrained and Bowie’s vocal performance nothing short of brilliant. The chorus with excellent backing vocals is the most “grandiose” Bowie has sounded for quite some time. This was released as the third single off the album and would have been a huge hit if it had been a Bowie “solo” effort (or indeed recorded by Iggy Pop). Music Video.

prisoner of love

Crack City” is one of those really “direct” moments on the album. Bowie’s scorn at the issue of drugs and the evilness of those “candymen” who peddle this type of death just hits one on the back of the head. Really heard. The music is hard and ferocious but nothing like the lyrics and Bowie’s scathing delivery, which are the most upfront and unambiguously savage in Bowie’s entire career. One gets the feeling after nearly succumbing to drugs and crack cocaine himself throughout the mid 70’s, Bowie and gang felt the need to tell it how it is. With lines such as:

May all your vilest nightmares
Consume your shrunken head
May the ho-ho-hounds of paranoia
Dance upon your stinking bed

Don’t look at me you fuckhead
This nation’s turning blue
Its stink it fouls the highways
Its filth, it sticks like glue”
Well this ain’t no frivolous “Modern Love” that will get you on the dance floor. Not even close.

I Can’t Read” lightens things up a little (relatively speaking anyways) and was Bowie’s favourite track on the album. Bowie laments the inability to read, while he aimlessly changes the channel on the TV in some lonesome existence. The mood and feel of this would have suited the “Low” sessions rather well, although the music is not quite as cutting edge or adventurous. I have to agree with Bowie with this being one of the best moments on the album. Bowie was so endeared with the song that he re-recorded it in 1997 for the film soundtrack to “The Ice Storm” and released that version as a single.

With “Under The God“, we return to the harder side of Tin Machine, with a manic, anti-fascist piece that derides the ugly far-right of UK politics, especially popular with skin-heads and racists at the time (Brexit anyone?). Hard to believe this was written by the same Thin White Duke who dangerously dabbled with far right musings a dozen years previously. “Washington heads in the toilet bowl, Don’t see supremacist hate, Right wing dicks in their boiler suits, Picking out who to annihilate” doesn’t really leave much doubt for their thoughts on the matter and accompanied with a raging rhythm section (not unlike “Lust For Life”) and with Gabrels manic guitar, this track is a real rocker. This was the lead-off single, promoted with a video featuring the band being mobbed onstage by uncontrollable thugs. Music Video.

under the god

Amazing” is one of the quieter moments, a lovely ballad on how amazing life is with someone special, although there’s that slight edge with the concern she might move on to someone else. The guitar work here by Grabrels is particularly exquisite, as are Bowie’s tender vocals and suggests perhaps Tin Machine should have recorded more tracks such as this.

Working Class Hero” is a cover of John Lennon’s classic and fits the anti-establishment feel of the album perfectly. I absolutely love the original Lennon version and is one of my favourite Lennon songs, so it was a thrill to hear Bowie and gang give it a go. Although nothing can beat the Lennon original, this isn’t a bad version with an appropriately sparse arrangement, Gabrels guitar to give it the Tin Machine signature and Bowie’s angry vocal delivery.

Bus Stop” is a fun little ditty about someones skepticism of a religious experience while waiting at the bus stop, which on reflection might just have been a result of last night’s curry. It’s about the only moment of humour on the album, so make the most of its 1 min 43 seconds. The band obviously had fun with this song when on tour, converting it into a bizarre country and western romp.

The next track “Pretty Thing” is a pretty standard rocker, with the rhythm section in charge here with the start/stop arrangement. The best part though is the weird little middle eight section where the track goes off into a different tangent before the long closing sequence, where I’ve always liked the texture Gabrels guitar provides on top of everything.

Video Crimes” is another rocker, with a somewhat stuttering feel that again fits the overall protesting theme of the album, this time lamenting the nasty videos that cause so many issues for society. Bowie plays the part of someone who obviously spends way too much time watching violent movies in his isolated existence and is contemplating “chopping” a few things up himself. It’s imagery on a level far more disturbing than on anything found on the likes of say “Diamond Dogs” or “Low”.

Run” features my favourite Gabrels (albeit brief) solo on the album, although it’s Armstrong’s guitar that features most predominantly on the track (I guess as he co-wrote the thing). I always viewed this as a recommendation on what to do if you ever met the creepy character from the previous song but is really about how Bowie would react if he doesn’t get the girl of his dreams. It’s typically dark and broody but Bowie sounds rather good here. Interestingly, “Run” and the next track “Sacrifice Yourself” didn’t appear on the LP version, no doubt due to space issues, but with most people now buying CDs, Bowie and gang were obviously keen that they be included. The fact the songs are simply not plonked at the end of the album and both have their lyrics in the album notes suggests they are legitimate members of the album proper.

Sacrifice Yourself” as I mentioned didn’t make it onto the LP version of the album and is another somewhat frantic number, with break-neck lyrics that again make references to a God (as in a number of the previous tracks). There’s nothing really that distinguishes this much from other tracks on the album and is one of my least favourite moments.

The album ends with “Baby Can Dance“, which reminds me the most of his previous 1983-1987 period material and could perhaps have fitted in on the “Never Let Me Down” album, where it would have been one of the better tracks. It does have the Tin Machine arrangement, which means upfront drums and lots of squealing guitars, but I’ve always liked this track and makes me wonder what some of the other earlier material would have sounded with Tin Machine playing or if some of the Tin Machine songs had a more commercial shine.

Tin Machine would tour the album extensively, but alas never in Australia (other than a one off, unannounced engagement in Sydney). The shows were generally well received (if you were expecting a Tin Machine experience) and were played in much smaller, more intimate venues than Bowie had played for a very long time. The shows featured no solo Bowie numbers to emphasise this was a real band to be taken seriously, which disappointed many and explained the much smaller crowds. But how I wish I could have attended one of the shows. The somewhat mediocre live album “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” was some consolation although one got a better taste of things with the “Live at the Docks” concert video recorded on 24 October 1991.

oy vey baby

I don’t believe history has done this original “Tin Machine” album justice, often forgotten and ignored as being from that “silly” Tin Machine period. Overall, it’s an album that indeed has a very distinctive edge, with a hardness and rawness that’s kinda unique in the Bowie cannon. The follow-up “Tin Machine II” album has a lot more of a melodic feel than found here with much of the rawness polished away. But this really is an excellent album that rewards with repeat listening.

For many however, this was the point in time when they stopped buying Bowie albums. The older generation often stopped buying albums in general anyways, while the newer generation had new heroes to follow. Which is a shame, as this album provided Bowie the circuit-breaker he needed to ditch his 80’s commercial tendencies and rejuvenate himself into making some truly brilliant solo albums throughout the 90’s and beyond.

The next album in my review will be the first of my top 20 Bowie albums and the first album to come from his 1970’s period. It might be a tad controversial as the next album in my ranking is often regarded as a much loved album from what is widely considered to be Bowie’s best decade of output. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: Tin Machine, Prisoner Of Love, I Can’t Read

25. Tin Machine II

tin machine II

Tin Machine II” is David Bowie’s 19th studio album and was originally released on 2 September 1991.

Strictly speaking this is of course the second and final Tin Machine (as in the band) studio album, but if you’re like me, who considers the whole Tin Machine phase just another Bowie persona, then this is effectively another David Bowie album.

After the first Tin Machine album and the general outcry that Bowie being just a member within a hard rock band was at best absurd and at worst just plain ludicrous, many assumed one album would be it. Having gotten things out of his system and attempted to move away from his 80’s era albums as far as is almost imaginable, most thought Bowie would return back to his solo ways, especially after spending much of 1990 on his hugely successful “Sound+ Vision” greatest hits world tour (but no Australia goddammit !!).

But Bowie had other ideas, perhaps to show everyone he won’t again be detracted by popular opinion and perhaps to add legitimacy to what Bowie frustratingly considered his best album in “Tin Machine” for quite some time.

Part of the delay between albums was Bowie trying to find a new record company after EMI clearly had enough of the “just one of the boys” Bowie. They refused to release a second Tin Machine album, so after a bit of shopping around the Victory label finally got the nod.

Recorded over an extended period of time between 1989-91, (although much of it in Sydney, Australia in 1989), “Tin Machine II” retained much of the grit and hard rock edginess of its predecessor. However, unlike the first Tin Machine album, which was just sheer brutality in its delivery, this album had a much more polished finish, with a few more melodies and a lot more subtlety in its sound.

As such, I actually prefer overall the comparative originality and shock value offerings of the first Tin Machine album. At its best, the material on “Tin Machine II” is equally as good (and in a few cases, arguably better) but I just feel this is a less even album with some of the relatively low offerings pulling down the overall album quality. I’m one of the very few people on this planet who loved the first Tin Machine album upon its release and as very good as this album is at times, it doesn’t quite have the thrill value of the first offering. That said, “Tin Machine II” is a much better album than most of the music critics at the time decried.

If Bowie being in Tin Machine wasn’t controversial enough, further controversy ensued with the album cover as it featured 4 nude statues with those naughty, manly dangly bits in full view. Obviously, the guys who work at the censors office hadn’t been to a museum lately, but in some countries, the statues had to be castrated with the good old airbrush. Similar issue to what happened with the original “Diamond Dogs” album, Bowie just seems to get foiled in his attempts to have bollocks on an LP cover.

The album kicks off with the rather excellent “Baby Universal“, bringing back memories of a “Cosmic Being” talking to all the young ones on Earth. It has all the ingredients of a Bowie classic, a driving rhythm, nice touches of guitar, catchy backing vocals, weird little background noises and lines such as “Hallo humans, nothing starts tomorrow”. It was released as the second single and would have been a hit if released as a Bowie solo offering. Music Video.

baby universal

One Shot“, the 3rd single off the album (and the last from Tin Machine) is unfortunately not as good, being a bit ploddy and one-dimensional. It has a drum beat that I could copy, a bit of a nothing guitar solo and an unusually unconvincing vocal by Bowie. There are much better songs on the album, although whether they be single worthy is a different discussion. Music Video.

one shot

We’re back on form with the next track, the wonderful lead off single, “You Belong In Rock n’ Roll“. I’ve always liked Bowie when he starts slow and quietly builds and this is a nice little example. With a steady beat slowly building up, the flourish of Bowie’s sax at the end of each verse is a delight. Bowie’s vocals here sound effortless and are among the best on the album. The band at their finest.  Music Video.

you belong in roll n roll

The cover of Roxy Music’s “If There Is Something” from their brilliant first album is up next. Tin Machine do an OK job of it, but it lacks the energy and spark of the original. The guitar work of Reeves Gabrels is a highlight though and worth investigating for this alone.

In the context of Tin Machine, the next track “Amlapura” is as quiet and gently a song as they recorded. Bowie has a well documented love of Indonesia (he reportedly wanted some of his ashes scattered there) and this song offers a romantic, dream-like landscape of this Indonesian island. It’s actually quiet beautiful and highlights a softer edge to the Tin Machine period which they probably should have explored a tad more. A highlight of their live shows, it’s also a highlight on the album.

Betty Wrong” comes next and probably has the most catchy chorus on the album. To use the word “commercial” might be stretching things a tad, but it does rather have the attributes for this to have been a hit. But only if recorded as a Bowie solo track.  Featuring another excellent Gabrels closing guitar solo, this track (in much extended  form) was one of the highlights of the rather ordinary “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” live album.

You Can’t Talk” is one of my favourites here as it returns to the more conventional Tin Machine sound, with much anguished guitars and frantic lyrics. The chorus (with associated backing vocals) has a nice melody and I don’t know, I’ve always just kinda like it.

With “Stateside” however, we hit a bit of a problem. Perhaps to prove that Tin Machine were really a collective band and not just David Bowie’s backing musicians, the drummer Hunt Sales got to sing on a couple of tracks. This first effort can only be described as pitiful, a dreary, ploddy, entirely boring, forgetful track that brings down the whole album. Thank goodness with CDs you can just hit next.

Shopping For Girls” is the best track on the album. A powerful song about the awful subject of child prostitution, Bowie sounds like the narrator of some shocking documentary, who strews a tide of words and thoughts without barely taking a breath. He can also barely hide his contempt for the guy who “grunts his reply in a garrulous croak, that’s a mighty big word for a nine year old”. There is no way such a song could ever be released as a single, but the haunting melody and shocking content makes this one of the most compelling songs in the Tin Machine cannon.

A Big Hurt” is all just a bit too loud with not enough happening musically or lyrically to hold your interest for long.  As I was thinking through the track list, I almost forgot this track, which kinda says all one needs to know.

Notable for the acoustic guitar sound, a rare thing for Tin Machine, “Sorry” is perhaps more notable for being their worst track. The second song sung by Hunt Sales, it almost makes “Stateside” sound positively brilliant in comparison. Sorry, is of course the perfect title for this sorry mess, but is really is as bad as a Bowie related recording has ever been. I’m trying to think of a worse song in the entire Bowie catalog. I’m get back to you. Where’s the next button on the remote, where where where !!

Goodbye Mr Ed” finishes on a much more positive footing, a really nice song on the subject of farewells. With typical obtuse lyrics, my mental image is of Bowie saying goodbye to America, the “tolerance to violence”,  shopping malls, and the TV show “Mister Ed”. But Bowie was of course saying hello to America about to move across there permanently and live out the rest of his days in New York. So I’m not suggesting this is an accurate mental image 🙂 Bowie was probably just saying goodbye to the whole Tin Machine period.

Hammerhead” is a hidden track that appears just after “Goodbye Mr Ed” that isn’t included in the official track listing. An instrumental jam, I had thought for many years  this was part of “Goodbye Mr Ed” but is the lads just letting off a bit of steam.

“Tin Machine II” is far from being one of Bowie’s best albums. But it’s far better than most of the reviews at the time of release had suggested. There are a number of very fine tracks, far more than the occasional dreadful ones that do indeed lurk in there.

After touring the album with Tin Machine between October 1991 and February 1992 on the “It’s My Life” tour, Bowie seemed to lose interest in the Tin Machine project. There was talk of a third album, but after the poor sales of the admittedly average “Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby” album, Bowie pulled the pin and went back to his solo career.

Reeves Gabrels would continue to be a key figure throughout Bowie’s work in the 1990’s, when Bowie would record four albums of a much higher caliber than he did throughout most of the 1980’s and with Tin Machine. But Tin Machine was a crucial part of the artistic process in moving Bowie on from the commercial influenced mess in found himself in during the 1983-1987 period and for that alone, we should be thankfully for what he managed to achieve with Tin Machine.

Much much better was to come from Bowie, including future masterpieces, but that’s a story for another day.

oy vey baby