24. David Bowie

david bowie 1st album

David Bowie” is David Bowie’s self-titled debut that was originally released on 1 June 1967.

By 1967, David Bowie had already been in the music industry for some 3 long, almost entirely unsuccessful years. He had released quite a number of mainly R ‘n’ B style singles, both with various bands (The King Bees, The Manish Boys, The Lower Third) and as a solo artist. And all had flopped dismally (which is great for us collectors as many are now quite valuable rarities).

Bowie then met Kennith Pitt, who would be his manager during his formative 1967-1970 years and managed somehow to secure Bowie an album contract with the Deram label, who were after someone a tad different to the norm. Pitt was of the belief that R ‘n’ B and rock music in general was not a long term career path and that if Bowie was interested in a future in the music industry, he needed to be an “all-round entertainer” and look at moving towards a more pop, cabaret, “music hall” oriented musical direction.

With his then backing band “The Buzz”, Bowie recorded his first ever album, the self-titled “David Bowie” probably his most bizarre, unBowie-like album of his entire career. If you only know Bowie from his greatest hits, you simply wouldn’t believe this to be a Bowie album. Heavily influenced by the likes of Tommy Steele and especially Anthony Newley (huge at the time and most well-known for his many hits in the late 50’s, early 60’s, starring in films such as “Oliver Twist” and musicals such as “Stop The World, I Want to Get Off”), the album is full of tragic little tales sung in that Anthony Newley London accent. It’s also the most “London” album the Bromley-based budding artist has ever made, with various references to his home town.

The music is pure pop, with weird little musical arrangements and big hall orchestrations, that is as far from conventional rock music as Bowie has ever been. That said, it does sometimes have a hint of the psychedelic child-like writings of Pink Floyd’s Syd Barrett, but without the original out-there spaced-out music that made the first Pink Floyd album such a classic. The rough theme of the album is a collection of quaint little tales, sometimes with a child-like yearning and more often than not, with a tragic element. Many of the songs come and go after a couple of minutes, no 10 minute odyssey here.

I remember where I first bought this album (the sea-side town of Skegness of all places) and after initially being somewhat surprised (shocked) by what I heard, soon grew to love it. And I love it still to this day, this is such a wonderful album that brings back lots of fond memories for me. It’s an album which although has always been critically maligned and which I readily admit is not up there with Bowie’s best, is an album which is very well worth a listen, and who knows, you might grow to like it as well. If I ranked albums more with my heart, then this album would probably be ranked much higher.

The album kicks-off with “Uncle Arthur“, the tale of a mommy’s boy 32 year old adult who finally finds a lovely girl Sally, only to return back to mum because his poor Sally’s cooking isn’t up to scratch. It’s a fun little song that’s typical of the album, but one which is hard to imagine say The Thin White Duke ever singing in 1976.

Sell Me A Coat” is nice, folk ballad that tells of the sadness of a love that is no more. Sadness is a key theme throughout the album, with sweet songs that often convey how things are no longer what they were. If I had to pick the weakest track on the album, this would be it.

Rubber Band” continues this theme, this time the tale of someone in love who goes off to war only to return to find his loved one is now in a relationship with the leader of the local park band. The jealousy and anger of the poor chap can’t but bring a tear to the eye. A version of this song was released as a single in late 1966 and sold about as few copies as all Bowie’s other singles to date. Music Video.

rubber band

Love You Till Tuesday” is a much more “up” song, a simple, quaint love song, in Bowie’s best Newley voice, on how upon meeting a girl promises to stay in love until at least Tuesday. Now that’s commitment , especially for the swinging 60’s. A version with a different vocal track was released as a single shortly after the album release. It was a flop like all his other previous singles.

love you till tuesday single

There Is A Happy Land” is a rather beautiful little song on the joys and pleasures of being a child. But there is a dark undertone regarding how adults can so easily wreak the happy land of childhood. It’s a theme that Bowie touches on a few times, perhaps more eerily and successfully on “After All” from the “The Man Who Sold The World” album.

Bowie goes a little political with “We Are Hungry Men“, how mankind is over populating the planet and unless we do something about it (free contraception pills, mass abortions, infanticide) we’re all doomed. Bowie’s audience (likely in a Bromley pub) have little interest in such measures and decide to eat the boring fear-monger. Gulp, Burp ends the track.

When I Live My Dream” is another lovely love song, this a dreamy romantic overture to a girl who unfortunately has an interest in all too many other boys. He desperately wants the girl but knows the beautiful dream he describes will never come true.

Little Bombardier” is yet another all too sad tale about poor, lonely Frankie Mear, a bombardier scared by war who finally finds friendship and companionship in the form of two children. Just when things are finally going well for the poor chap, the mean arm of authority forces him to leave the town (an adult hanging out with 2 young children, that can’t be healthy), his reputation in shatters, never to return again.

At around this time, Bowie had a keen interest in Buddhism (he even seriously considered moving to a monastery). “Silly Boy Blue” is song about spiritual escapism that evokes imagery of Tibet and butter statues that has a killer bass line throughout.

Come And Buy My Toys” is a nice acoustic number that again evokes imagery of the joys of being a young child and how in the near future one will eventually grow up to the tiredsome responsibilities of adulthood. But for now, you’re still young enough to enjoy the toys on offer.

Join The Gang” is a fun song espousing all the joys of joining a trendy gang, hanging out in pubs and clubs while paying for overpriced crisps and coke drinks. If only a coke was still just 15 bob.

She’s Got Medals” tells the cautionary tale of Mary, a somewhat butch woman who enjoys hanging out with the blokes, joins the army during the war but before they all get wiped out by a bomb,  deserts and decides that the feminine life isn’t so bad after all.

Maid Of Bond Street” is short ditty about a beautiful London based model that has every luxury that life has to offer. Everything that is except the man she really wants, he’s too jealous of her fortunate lifestyle. The arrangements here are just a pure joy.

The final track “Please Mr. Gravedigger“, isn’t really a song at all but a short theatrical piece featuring rain, thunderclaps and the sounds of soil being dug as a serial killer (with a nasty cold) describes why he’s digging the grave of his soon to be latest victim. It’s as hilarious as it’s downright bizarre.

All in all, it really is a fun, lighthearted album that has many surprises and highlights. But alas, a hit it wasn’t meant to be (reaching only 125 on the UK charts), although another album released on the same day did enjoy some commercial and critical success. The other album was “Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band” by a group called The Beatles !! So some stiff competition there.

That said, this album would have to be one of the most re-released and re-packaged albums of all time and over the 50+ years since it’s original release would have sold quite a number. Deram were to drop Bowie after this album failed in the charts but always retained rights to the album. As such, they’ve milked this album for all it’s worth again and again and again. If you were to buy it now, I would recommend the excellent 2CD Deluxe Edition, that includes both original mono and stereo mixes and a CD worth of other tracks from the same period. This years Record Store Day will also release a limited coloured vinyl version of the album, so the milking continues.

It’s worth noting some of the tracks from this period that didn’t make the original track list as there are a number of “classic” Bowie songs among them.

Did You Ever Have A Dream” featured on the B-side of the “Love You Till Tuesday” single and is a joyous ride on the wonder of dreams and how they enable you to go wherever you want to go and be with whoever you want to be with. It’s a return to the theme of dreams and a method of escape from Bowie’s then dreary south London suburbia reality.

When I’m Five” is a truly charming song, beautifully sung with the innocence and wonder of a soon to be 5 year old. It’s one of my favourites from this time period and featured on the “Love You Till Tuesday” film and soundtrack (discussed below).

The London Boys” is arguably the first truly great David Bowie song. Featured only on the B-Side of the “Rubber Band” single, Bowie was a little afraid that the drug references of a Mod trying to survive on the London streets didn’t fit the mood of the album. But it’s a fantastic song, with a performance that really does highlight what a talent Bowie would eventually blossom to be.

The Laughing Gnome” was released as a single just prior to the album and in those days, many singles didn’t make it onto the album. This is probably Bowie’s best known piece during this period, especially so as those cheeky buggers at Deram decided to re-release the single in 1973 at the height of Bowie-mania during the Ziggy Stardust period. To the undoubted embarrassment of the then glam, rock God Bowie, it was a hit and reached No. 6 on the UK charts. Featuring lots of terrible gnome jokes and sped up gnome voices,  it’s one of those songs that’s so bad that it’s almost good. It’s hard not to listen to this without the occasional smile and groan escaping. Bowie would return to the use of multi-speed vocals throughout his career, notably on classic tracks such as “The Bewlay Brothers”, “Fame” and “Scream Like A Baby”. During the 1990 “Sound+Vision” tour where fans were asked to vote for their favourite Bowie song, this got the most votes. Bowie respectfully decided against the wishes of the masses and was never fully performed.

the laughing gnome

The Gospel According To Tony Day” was the B-Side to “The Laughing Gnome” and is a song about a bunch of wankers who pretend to be friends, but really aren’t. We’ve all had some in our lives.

In The Heat Of The Morning” is a slightly more “rock” oriented song than much from this period, although strings are still predominant in the arrangement. A rather charming love song, it’s perhaps most notable as the first song ever produced by Tony Visconti, who would be such a key figure throughout much of Bowie’s subsequent career.

Let Me Sleep Next To You“, is an even rocker track, one which Bowie’s mum didn’t approve of at all as she thought is was a bit “dirty”. Always a good sign me thinks, Bowie is trying to convince a younger girl that she’s now old enough for the “pleasures” of adulthood. Hmmm, maybe Bowie’s mum had a point.

After the commercial failure of the album, Kennith Pitt decided to make a film showcasing much of the album for prospective record labels. The resultant “Love You Till Tuesday” film is a wonderful reminder of the times and is well worth watching. Bowie felt it needed a new song to highlight how he could write a hit and wrote a new song all about Major Tom, an astronaut who get’s lost in space… Trailer Here.

love you till tuesday movie

Once Bowie recorded his next album in 1969 (strangely also self-title “David Bowie”), he very rarely referred to his first album again. Around the year 2000, Bowie recorded the (never officially released) “Toys” album, where he returned to some of these tracks (including Silly Boy Blue, The London Boys, Let Me Sleep Next To You and In The Heat Of The Morning), so he didn’t entirely dismiss this period.

Although I do love this album, it’s fortunate indeed the album was a commercial flop and Kennith Pitt’s plan to mold Bowie into an all-round entertainer failed. It would have been a tragic loss to the rock world if Bowie’s career was destined to be appearances at Christmas pantomimes each year. Phew, we dodged a bullet here.

Unfortunately for Bowie, it would be another 2 years yet until “Space Oddity” would finally give Bowie the hit he had been craving and 5 years until he finally “made” the big time and become an international superstar. But that’s a story for another day.

Best Tracks: When I Live My Dream, Join The Gang, Maid Of Bond Street

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